What was the last book you read?

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Postby emm7 » Tue Mar 10, 2009 5:55 pm

cheers KC!
well I once had a dream of doing a job similar to yours, wanted to get a doctorate on topic of male and female bodies in British literature & even had two places at good universities to do it, but no cash. (Over here in UK seems to me there isn't any funding to be had in arts subjects unless you're the best student in the country with a double First from Oxbridge!!! )

Anyway I had a change of heart and realised I'd rather be attempting my own creative writing however appallingly lame it was.
I realised that I wanted to be a fiction writer rather than an academic.
I adore literature and I feel a bit of regret every day that I can't spend my whole day doing what I love which is reading and writing stories! I still have that as a dream though!
Also at that time in my life I didn't think I'd be able to cope with the stress of the doctorate and the infamous attack of the blues it gives most people, three years working pretty much alone on a crucial project is damn tough.

For a job I ended up programming computers, am self-taught and doing ok. Am a visual thinker which helps.

Excellent so Haraway is on the staff at your university, that's very interesting!

Yes couldn't agree more about falling down the theory minehole.... it did happen to me when doing my MPhil I think! You do get incredibly drawn in to it. I have to admit I do see it now looking back as a kind of massive three dimensional intellectual chessgame with the same kind of hypnotic absorbing effect. I started to realise it may not have been healthy when I went to see a film at the cinema for some downtime and couldn't relax because my mind was performing a critical theoretical running commentary of the film's themes and imagery on autopilot like a little machine :shock: :wink:

As long as you can switch it off when you want and put it back in the box and go out and have a laugh and a joke and forget all about it then you're doing alright :D

A few years later I did adore doing an evening class on psychoanalytic theory as a lens for viewing modern art at Tate Modern though, have still got the notes and they're damn good :D

Ah now what is Technocapitalism and how do animals fit into it?
Do they mean capitalism that's made possible in new ways by new technologies?
To me Haraway's writing seems incredibly pro-technology, I think she sees technology as giving people more freedom not less?
"she was my better half and I was just a dog"
"I don't have a drinking problem except when I can't get a drink"
"No, the moon ain't romantic, it's intimidating as hell
And some guy's trying to sell me a watch"
-- Tom Waits Bad Liver and a Broken Heart
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Postby emm7 » Sat Mar 21, 2009 11:00 pm

have just been reading:

"The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Powerful and vivid use of first person present tense, gives the story a very modern feel even though it's Victorian! Very disturbing. Excellent use of unreliable narrator. Starts off with the narrator, a female writer recently having given birth and depressed, forbidden from doing any creative work by her medic husband (but she is still attempting to write on the sly). Enjoyed this book a lot even though the ending is scary!

"The Enneagram" by Smon Parke. Unusual and original book about the Enneagram much of it written in epistolary format. What I like about it is its quirkiness and individualism and the way it leaps off at tangents. Also some of it is quite poetic in style. Sense of the author's personal voice coming through, and even lyricism and bizarre use of metaphor in parts! Which you don't usually get in non-fiction (unless it's non-fiction written by George Orwell :D)
Anyway am reading this book in the hope of understanding people better who think very differently to me, and better being able to delve into their mindset.
"she was my better half and I was just a dog"
"I don't have a drinking problem except when I can't get a drink"
"No, the moon ain't romantic, it's intimidating as hell
And some guy's trying to sell me a watch"
-- Tom Waits Bad Liver and a Broken Heart
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Postby sosso » Sat May 09, 2009 12:21 am

I'm reading The Beach by Alex Garland for the second time.
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Postby Spalvid » Sat May 09, 2009 7:38 am

It has been a while since a read a novel now, but I got a tip and loaned "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy. Extremely bleak and apocalyptic, but somehow I appreciate what I got more when I read it.
After all we could all be wandering around in burned out world with piles of ash everywhere and no sun and the most precious thing in our lives just barely making it, and sharing every danger that we´re in.

The world, and we, are fragile. So let´s cherish what we got.
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Postby Johnboy74 » Tue May 12, 2009 4:08 pm

'The Architecture of Happiness' By Alain De Botton :D
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Postby sosso » Wed May 13, 2009 12:01 pm

I just finished Are You Experienced by William Sutcliffe. So funny and made me laugh out loud several times. Loved it. I think anyone who has been backpacking will get a kick out of it.

I'm into travel writing at the moment.. any recommendations?
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Postby Crash » Wed May 13, 2009 2:15 pm

The Cases That Haunt Us by John E. Douglas and Mark Olshaker

Please note: this is the last book I read, not my recommendation for travel writing. :oops:
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Postby KC Masterpiece » Wed May 13, 2009 3:53 pm

sosso wrote:I'm into travel writing at the moment.. any recommendations?


Bill Bryson is always a safe bet
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Postby Hiking Fox » Wed May 13, 2009 5:33 pm

Personally, I hate Bill Bryson. His books have this patronising, 'look at your cute, quaint little British island' tone to them, that grates on me.
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Postby emm7 » Sat May 16, 2009 10:19 pm

been reading some of Grahame Greene's collected letters, I got through a significant number of them standing in the bookshop!
Am fascinated by Greene's colourful life story and all his passionate love letters to his mistresses! Very intense and Byronic for sure. He wrote that his passion and Melancholia are what made him able to be a writer. I bet he was not easy to live with and that's an understatement.... am not at all surprised he left his first wife and wrote that he wasn't husband material! Also he drank a hell of a lot, one of the letters he writes how he's in bed writing this but had a few drinks and about to pour another..... :shock:
He wrote a lot of letters. Am wondering now in electronic age we don't write letters on paper anymore, we use emails instead.
So how could they produce a collected letters nowadays. It would have to be collected emails!

I would love to go back to pre-email days like when I was a kid and you wrote to people with a pen and paper.
"she was my better half and I was just a dog"
"I don't have a drinking problem except when I can't get a drink"
"No, the moon ain't romantic, it's intimidating as hell
And some guy's trying to sell me a watch"
-- Tom Waits Bad Liver and a Broken Heart
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Postby ninearms » Wed May 20, 2009 11:53 am

sosso wrote:I'm into travel writing at the moment.. any recommendations?


"The Places In Between" by Rory Stewart, covers his walk across Afghanistan post 9/11.
“Begin at the beginning,” the King said gravely, “and go on till you come to the end. Then stop.”
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Postby Gelert » Wed May 20, 2009 1:23 pm

ninearms wrote:
sosso wrote:I'm into travel writing at the moment.. any recommendations?


"The Places In Between" by Rory Stewart, covers his walk across Afghanistan post 9/11.


+1.

His other book, "Occupational Hazards" makes for an interesting read as well, although that isn't exactly travel writing.

Currently I'm reading TE Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom.
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Postby ninearms » Wed May 20, 2009 3:25 pm

Just finished this a few minutes ago:

Image

I guess you could call it a love story...

Now I'm finally getting round to reading The Boardman Tasker Omnibus, which has been sat on my shelf for years.

I pretty much only read books that involve wilderness in some form.
“Begin at the beginning,” the King said gravely, “and go on till you come to the end. Then stop.”
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Postby Mr. Cleetus » Thu May 21, 2009 12:46 am

Expert Political Judgment: How Good Is It? How Can We Know?
by Philip E. Tetlock

...which is surprisingly interesting!
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Postby andi. » Thu May 21, 2009 3:38 pm

omar tan wrote:just finished survivor by chuck palhaniuk


one of my favorite books ever.

right now i am reading Hold Tight by Harlan Coben. It's one of those books you just cant put down, because theres way too much information to take in.
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