What foods are always in your shopping cart/ fridge/ pantry?

Going vegan and new vegans in need of support or information.

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Postby dublin dave » Sat Oct 27, 2007 11:31 am

I can't believe that tahini (protein and calcium) is not on the list yet. Essential for making houmous and perfect on toast with some yeast extract... :D
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Postby Edison Carasio » Tue Oct 30, 2007 4:29 am

I would say spinach is a must on that list. And tempeh was a great suggestion. Avocados also could even go under the fats list, since they have more fat then butter, by the ounce. Artichoke is another great veggie. Steam it for a half hour and throw the petals or the chopped heart onto a deep fried tofu sandwhich for a nice hearty sandwhich. Vegan wheat wraps/tortillas are great with the beans (black beans are the best). Just heat the beans, drain, throw them on the tortilla/wrap with some chunky salsa and you have a hearty meal. And while we're on the subject, salsa is a must.
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Postby C PERKINS » Tue Nov 20, 2007 11:06 am

i'm a vegan baby still - 3 mnths, 12 days, 14 hours... and not finding it easy as I used to survive on a junk food (albeit vegetarian) diet for most of my adult life.

It was therefore no consolation when the health shop owner, provided me with HEMP POWDER and QUINOA as staples, and per my request for something just delish to nibble on, presented me with dried go-ji berries.Ack!
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Postby Man On Bike. » Tue Nov 20, 2007 8:34 pm

C PERKINS wrote:i'm a vegan baby still - 3 mnths, 12 days, 14 hours... and not finding it easy as I used to survive on a junk food (albeit vegetarian) diet for most of my adult life.

It was therefore no consolation when the health shop owner, provided me with HEMP POWDER and QUINOA as staples, and per my request for something just delish to nibble on, presented me with dried go-ji berries.Ack!
So... has this list been of much use to you?
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Postby C PERKINS » Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:09 am

Absolutely.
Although I was also devastated that olives got a 'could try harder in the protein department' report card.
I have been feeding my salt craving by guzzling buckets of these.
Maybe that explains why I have actually been gaining weight since becoming vegan. That, and the fact that this is avocado country.
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Postby ericajones80 » Tue Nov 27, 2007 3:47 pm

Fantastic list! most of the items on there i currently use or have used, but there are some that I am looking forward to trying :P
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Postby boomana » Tue Jan 15, 2008 6:19 am

Maybe add barley, couscous and millet on the grains list.
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Postby Ambi » Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:19 pm

On the dried vs. tinned beans issue, if I was poorer I'd cook up a load of dried beans and freeze them to use when needed.

Brown basmati rice is more expensive than standard brown, but tastes great. It's a bit lighter too so worth a try if you're not that into wholegrains.
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Postby Konstantin » Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:48 pm

C PERKINS wrote:Although I was also devastated that olives got a 'could try harder in the protein department' report card.
I have been feeding my salt craving by guzzling buckets of these.


You might want to try switching to unrefined sea salt. This stuff is grey, not white, and feels sort of damp because it doesn't sprinkle. It can come coarse or fine. It has much lower sodium, so you can eat loads without getting into the risk category. It also has other good stuff - refined table salt has 2 elements, unrefined sea salt has about 83.

Lots of people purposely eat 1/2 teaspoon day minimum. I've switched to it completely and glad I did.
You can see my training log if you're really bored: [url]www.veganfitness.net/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=16086&start=360[/url]
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Postby Ambi » Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:14 pm

That's not the sea salt I get from Sainsburys or H&B, is it? I use it for the added nutrients, but the fine type looks just like table salt.
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Postby Man On Bike. » Tue Jan 15, 2008 6:19 pm

Papaya wrote:You might want to try switching to unrefined sea salt. This stuff is grey, not white, and feels sort of damp because it doesn't sprinkle. It can come coarse or fine. It has much lower sodium, so you can eat loads without getting into the risk category. It also has other good stuff - refined table salt has 2 elements, unrefined sea salt has about 83.

Lots of people purposely eat 1/2 teaspoon day minimum. I've switched to it completely and glad I did.
The unrefined sea salt that I've seen contains 90% sodium chloride. Not much lower in sodium than refined salt, so I wouldn't recommend anyone 'eat loads' of it.

It contains other minerals - calcium, magnesium, potassium. But is it really that much 'healthier' than normal salt because of this? I doubt that very much. You will easily get all the above minerals from a good diet. I like salt but other than improving the taste of my dinner I don't think it's particularly beneficial even in its unrefined form.

I noticed that Goodness Direct lists this salt as 'organic'. Salt is an inorganic compound, a mineral; it comes from neither plant nor animal. How the f*** can it be considered organic in any way?!
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Postby fredrikw » Tue Jan 15, 2008 6:52 pm

Man On Bike. wrote:It contains other minerals - calcium, magnesium, potassium. But is it really that much 'healthier' than normal salt because of this? I doubt that very much. You will easily get all the above minerals from a good diet. I like salt but other than improving the taste of my dinner I don't think it's particularly beneficial even in its unrefined form.

depends actually. heavy sweating can lead to electrolyte imbalance, and then you definitely need to supplement to get the electrolytes back. so yes, refined or unrefined minerals can indeed be beneficial if you are training.

I noticed that Goodness Direct lists this salt as 'organic'. Salt is an inorganic compound, a mineral; it comes from neither plant nor animal. How the f*** can it be considered organic in any way?!

are you serious? I thought it was common knowledge that 'organic' isn't a describer of the chemical compound of food, bur rather a describer of the manufacturing of it. otherwise all food would be organic, and surely that's not the case, right?
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Postby Man On Bike. » Tue Jan 15, 2008 8:41 pm

fredrikw wrote:
I noticed that Goodness Direct lists this salt as 'organic'. Salt is an inorganic compound, a mineral; it comes from neither plant nor animal. How the f*** can it be considered organic in any way?!

are you serious? I thought it was common knowledge that 'organic' isn't a describer of the chemical compound of food, bur rather a describer of the manufacturing of it. otherwise all food would be organic, and surely that's not the case, right?



All food is organic; however, it may not have been 'organically grown'. 'Organic' has various definitions - ignoring the use of the word to describe carbon-containing compounds, the word 'organic' literally means 'from the organ' or 'of the organ' and can be used to describe any living organism, or a product of any living organism.

When used to describe food or food products, 'organic' means the food has been "grown without the use of conventional pesticides, artificial fertilizers, human waste, or sewage sludge, and that they were processed without ionizing radiation or food additives". How can salt be organic if a) none of the above apply to salt production, b) it is not a product of plant or animal, c) it hasn't been grown and is not a product of anything that's been grown?

There are myriad different organizations that can certify a product as 'organic'; each one of these organizations has different criteria for certifying a product 'organic'. Because of this, the word 'organic' has been so far removed from its original meaning that it barely has a defined meaning anymore.

If you can call salt organic then by the same logic I could pick up rock from the street and call that organic. I'm sure it would sell for £40 a gram to some dumb rich person in a health food store.
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Postby fredrikw » Tue Jan 15, 2008 9:16 pm

Man On Bike. wrote:If you can call salt organic then by the same logic I could pick up rock from the street and call that organic. I'm sure it would sell for £40 a gram to some dumb rich person in a health food store.

I'd buy it, no questions asked.
:lol:

jokes aside, you do have a point, but since the word organic is used in such varied and uncontrolled manner it's a bit strange to get all worked up about salt :)
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Postby Man On Bike. » Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:55 pm

I've just realised that there's an accidental drug reference in that post - selling rocks for £40 a gram :D
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