Cordyceps - heard of em?

New vegan products out there? Queries about products, ingredients, vegan supplements?

Moderators: hardcore iv, fredrikw, JP, stateofflux, bronco

Cordyceps - heard of em?

Postby Dave Noisy » Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:03 pm

Hey all - a friend of mine (TCM/doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine) swears by cordyceps, wondering if anyone else has had any experiences with it/them?

Below is an article from him, sorry for some of the screwy formatting:

==========
Cordyceps

Cordyceps is considered by many herbalists to be one of the most powerful and valuable tonic herbs. Wild cordyceps can be found in isolated places in southwestern China where it costs up to $10 000 per kilogram. In ancient China this fungus was used exclusively in the Emperor's Palace because of its scarcity and expense.

Tibetan herdsmen first discovered Cordyceps over a thousand years ago thinking it was a type of grass. They noticed that when their sheep and yaks grazed on Cordyceps they became stronger and healthier. Later, Chinese herbalists began to use Cordyceps for a host of human ailments. The mushroom was used as a cure-all, but was especially thought to increase vitality and improve sexual function.

Cordyceps has more recently become famous because of its powerful aphrodisiac effects, immune enhancing properties and remarkable athletic performance improvements. The clinical studies done on Cordyceps in China indicate the fungus can improve liver functions, reduce cholesterol, adjust protein metabolism, improve immune functions, and inhibit cancer. It also has therapeutic value in the treatment of aging disorders including loss of sexual drive.

Modern scientific growing techniques have created a cultivated cordyceps that is stronger than wild cordyceps in certain biological components that are responsible for its effects.

Energy and Vitality

In 1993, China's Wan Jun-Sha broke the 10,000 meter world record by an amazing 40 seconds at the World Track and Field meet in Stuttgart, Germany. She was suspected of using illegal steroids because of the huge time improvement. After extensive drug testing, she was cleared, and it was revealed that she was only using Cordyceps and other Chinese herbs.

Animal studies have shown cordyceps increases the ratio of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the liver by 45-55% - which is beneficial in terms of energy metabolism and the potential for athletic performance enhancement.18 Mice fed cordyceps and subjected to an extreme low oxygen environment, were able to utilize oxygen more efficiently (30-50% increase), better tolerate acidosis and hypoxia (lack of oxygen) and live 2-3 times longer than a control group.27

A small study presented at the American College of Sports Medicine annual meeting (1999), showed that cordyceps significantly increases maximal oxygen uptake and anaerobic threshold, which may lead to improved exercise capacity and resistance to fatigue.28 Research has shown an increase in liver ATP:Pi (inorganic phosphate) ratio indicating more energy within the liver for metabolism. Other areas of benefit include increasing SOD (an overall antioxidant) activity, strengthening immune function, kidney function and improving glucose metabolism.29

In a number of Chinese clinical studies, primarily in elderly patients with fatigue, cordyceps-treated patients reported significant improvements in their level of fatigue, ability to tolerate cold temperatures, memory, cognitive capacity and sex drive. Patients with respiratory diseases also reported feeling physically stronger. Overall, the efficacy rate for cordyceps in alleviating fatigue in elderly subjects was 80-90%.22

The New York Journal of Medicine reported that Cordyceps has properties similar to Ginseng, being used to strengthen the body after exhaustion or long term illness. Research on Cordyceps has suggested that it increases energy by improving ATP production by over 30% and oxygen utilization by over 40%. 18,27

Certain polysaccharides and glycoproteins in Cordyceps may also boost energy and reduce fatigue by increasing testosterone levels, which has been observed in numerous studies.29,30,33 In one study, cordyceps increased plasma testosterone levels in mice with low testosterone by almost 170%.29

Libido and Sexual Function

Traditional Chinese Medicine has used cordyceps to improve libido and male sexual function for thousands of years. Its effectiveness led to its almost exclusive use by Chinese emperors because of its popularity and expense. The mushroom extract can induce sex steroid-like effects and increase testosterone in mice.29,30,33 The increase in testosterone may be one of the reasons for the improvement in libido in several studies done on elderly people. Recent studies performed at Beijing Medical University of China and in Japan have shown a 64% success rate among men suffering from impotence, vs. 24% in the placebo group. Clinical tests performed at Hunan Medical University have shown that cordyceps is effective in relaxing the smooth muscles tissue of the penis, increasing blood flow, resulting in harder erections. Other research also show that cordyceps improves male sexual function and intracellular ATP production 23, 24.

Immunity and Antiaging

The pharmacological actions of cordyceps are due mainly to its bioactive polysaccharides, modified nucleosides, and cyclosporin-like metabolites. polysaccharides, ophiocordin (an antibiotic compound), cordycepin, cordypyridones, nucleosides, bioxanthracenes, sterols, alkenoic acids, and exo-polymers.3 4 5 6 7 8 9Compounds found in cordyceps are also classified as HDPs, or host defense potentiators. Combinations of these compounds are now believed to stimulate the human immune system, and may aid in neuron transmission, metabolism, hormonal balance, and nutrient and oxygen transport. Research shows that cordyceps benefits the liver and hepatic system by activating Kupffer cell function, increasing SOD (by 54%) and glutathione peroxidase in the liver, raising plasma albumin, and inhibiting inflammation and liver fibrosis. 10,25,26,27

In the ancient China, cordyceps was highly recommended as one of the most effective medicines for all illness. Due to its anti-aging and cure-all properties, it can be compared to ginseng and reishi mushroom. Many Chinese clinical studies have shown improvements in liver, kidney and immune, and cholesterol problems. A number of studies also show that cordyceps may have anti-cancer, immune-enhancing, and antioxidant effects. 10 11 12 13 14 It also helps strengthen the immune system of tumor patients who have received radiotherapy, chemotherapy or surgery. It helps to stabilize the hemogram, increasing the blood cells and protein for producing blood plasma and for eliminating side- effects after various cancer therapies. Cordyceps has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of both leukemia and lung cancer in vitro. It has been used in studies on radiotherapy in China to improve the effectiveness of cancer treatments. The tumor inhibiting and immune enhancing effects of cordyceps may be due to the sterols found in it. 9 34 35 36

Cordyceps has also shown benefits for treating hepatitis B and inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. 27 37 38

Cordyceps has a long history of use in treating asthma has been shown in studies to be beneficial for asthma and other lung and bronchial inflammation conditions. 29

Traditional Chinese Medicine

In China, Cordyceps is used medically to regulate and support the gonads and as a lung and adrenal tonic. It is used specifically for excess tiredness, chronic cough and asthma, impotence, debility, anemia, to build the bone marrow and reduce excess phlegm. It has also been demonstrated that Cordyceps enhances blood circulation and can lower LDL cholesterol while raising beneficial HDL cholesterol. 14 32 Chinese athletes use Cordyceps as a safe alternative to dangerous performance-enhancing drugs.

It is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for:

 Relieving asthma
 Increasing lung function
 Boosting libido and sexual function
 Improving athletic performance
 Improving energy
 Improving immunity
 Regulating blood sugar
 Decreasing appetite
 Decreasing alcohol and drug desire


Cordyceps dosage:

1 to 3 grams per day for maintenance; 3 to 6 grams per day for optimal effects. Users should experience an improvement in energy and vitality after a period of two to three weeks. Long term use can help to improve longevity.

Side effects or interactions:

Cordyceps has a long history of use and is generally considered safe.16 A 7-day exposure to 80 g/kg of Cordyceps did not result in any negative effects in a recent laboratory study. There is no safety information available regarding pregnancy, lactation, or use in children, so it should not be used in these situations. Cordyceps and Ginkgo biloba may have mild blood-thinning properties. Use with caution when taking anti-coagulant (blood-thinning) medications. Use with caution when taking MAO inhibitors. Use with caution if you experience low blood sugar related condtions. If you are hypersentive to mushrooms, do not take.
About this strain of Cordyceps

The strain of Cordyceps in this product is recognized by the Chinese government as similar to wild Cordyceps sinensis, a rare fungus that grows above 15,000 feet in the Tibetan Highlands of China.

This strain is grown under low temperature, low oxygen conditions - equal to 18,000 feet elevation, just like nature.

Analytical testing recently completed by the chemists at Integrated Biomolecule Inc. of Tucson, Arizona, has revealed that this cultivated Cordyceps has more than four times the nucleoside content, and nearly five times more of the total active ingredients than the wild collected variety.

The Cordyceps is grown in specially designed refrigerated containers, in a very low oxygen environment. This is exactly the opposite of the way in which all other mushrooms are grown. Warm-and-wet is the usual rule for mushroom cultivation. While other cultivators are growing their Cordyceps in only four or five days, this strain takes nearly six months to grow. The resulting Cordyceps contains active ingredient levels up to 5 times higher than the best wild samples.

Our supplier is the largest producer of Cordyceps in North America, and presently the only American cultivator supplying Cordyceps to China. They use a blend of ingredients which was specially developed in order to maximize the bioactive compounds produced by the Cordyceps. It is grown on organically grown millet and sorghum grain and then several other organic components are added to bring the substrate up to the exact nutritional requirements of the Cordyceps. About 22-24 weeks after the growth cycle is started the Cordyceps is ready to harvest. At that time there is only about 2-3% of the original grain remaining. In the final product, there is virtually no residual grain or other substrate - only 100% pure Cordyceps. This Cordyceps is much higher quality than any of the other brands of cordyceps, which often test as primarily rice starch. Even in the wild collected variety there is some caterpillar remains and soil residue.

 Grown Only in Glass Containers – Not plastic or Metal
 Grown at Only 50% atmospheric Oxygen
 Grown at Nearly Freezing Temperatures – Only 4° C
 Grown for 6 months - not fermented 4 or 5 days as in China
 100% USDA Certified Organic

Nutrition

Main Ingredients: Polysaccharides, adenosine, adenine, uracil, guanine, thymin deoxyriboside, uracil deoxyriboside, 18 different amino acids (including 8 essential ones), polypeptides, mannitol, protein, organic acids, different micronutrients (P, Se, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Na, Cu, Zn, Al, Si, Cr, V, Ni, Sr, Ti and Mo), vitamins (B1, B2, B12, E & K), ergosterol, superoxide dismutase (SOD.

For more information contact Roots of Health – (250) 384-7668, or andy@wholefoodshealth.com

References
1. Yue QC, Ning W, Hui Z, Liang HQ. Differentiation of medicinal Cordyceps species by rDNA ITS sequence analysis. Planta Med 2002;68:635–39.
2. Hobbs C. Medicinal Mushrooms: An exploration of tradition, healing and culture. Santa Cruz, CA: Botanica Press, 1995.
3. Ling YJ, Sun YJ, Zhang LvP, Zhang CK. Measurement of cordycepin and adenosine in stroma of Cordyceps sp. by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). J Biosci Bioeng 2002;94:371–74.
4. Yuan YS, Zhang L, Xu XF, et al. Determination of nucleosides in cordyceps by RP–HPLC. Chin Pharm J China 2002;37:776–8.
5. Isaka M, Tantichareon M, Thebtaranonth Y. Structures of cordypyridones A-D, antimalarial N-hydroxy- and N-methoxy-2-pyridones from the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps nipponica. J Org Chem 2001;66:4803–08.
6. Isaka M, Kongsaeree P, Thebtaranonth Y. Bioxanthracenes from the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps pseudomilitaris BCC 1620 II. Structure elucidation. J Antibiot 2001;54:36–43.
7. Isaka M, Tanticharoen M, Thebtaranonth Y. Cordyanhydrides A and B. Two unique anhydrides from the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps pseudomilitaris BCC 1620. Tetrahedron Lett 2000;41:1657–60.
8. Kim DH, Yang BK, Jeong SC, et al. A preliminary study on the hypoglycemic effect of the exo-polymers produced by five different medicinal mushrooms. J Microbiol Biotechn 2001;11:167–71.
9. Bok JW, Lermer L, Chilton J, et al. Antitumor sterols from the mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis. Phytochem 1999;51:891–898.
10. Nakamura K, Yamaguchi Y, Kagota S, et al. Activation of in vivo Kupffer cell function by oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis in rats. Jpn J Pharmacol 1999;79:505–8.
11. Nakamura K, Yamaguchi Y, Kagota S, et al. Inhibitory effect of Cordyceps sinensis on spontaneous liver metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma and B16 melanoma cells in syngenic mice. Jpn J Pharmacol 1999;79:335–41.
12. Lui JL, Lui RY. Enhancement of cordyceps tail polysaccharide on cellular immunological function in vitro. Chin Pharm J China 2001;36:738–41 [in Chinese].
13. Shin KH, Lim SS, Lee SH, et al. Antioxidant and immunostimulating activities of the fruiting bodies of Paecilomyces japonica, a new type of Cordyceps sp. Ann NY Acad Sci 2001;928:261–73.
14. Yamaguchi Y, Kagota S, Nakamura K, et al. Antioxidant activity of the extracts from fruiting bodies of cultured Cordyceps sinensis. Phytother Res 2000;14:647–9.
15. Hobbs C. Medicinal Mushrooms: An exploration of tradition, healing and culture. Santa Cruz, CA: Botanica Press, 1995.
16. McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A. American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1998.
17. Wu TN, Yang KC, Wang CM, et al. Lead poisoning caused by contaminated Cordyceps, a Chinese herbal medicine: Two case reports. Sci Total Environ 1996;182:193–5.
18. Chang HM, But PPH (eds.) Pharmacology and Applications of Chinese Materia Medica, vol. 1. Philadelphia, PA: World Scientific, 1986. pp. 410-413.
19. Jones K. Cordyceps: Tonic Food of Ancient China. Seattle, WA: Sylvan Press, Inc., 1997.
20. Kuo YC, Tsai WJ, Shiao MS, et al. Cordyceps sinensis as an immunomodulatory agent. American Journal of Chinese Medicine 1996;24:111-125.
21. Wu TN, Yang KC, Wang CM, et al. Lead poisoning caused by contaminated cordyceps, a Chinese herbal medicine: two case reports. The Science of the Total Environment 1996;182:193-195.
22. Xiao Y, Huang XZ, Chen G, et al. Increased aerobic capacity in healthy elderly human adults given a fermentation product of cordyceps Cs-4. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 1999;31(Suppl.):S174 (abstract).
23. Yang WZ, Deng Xa, Hu W. 1985. Treatment of sexual hypofunction with Cordyceps sinensis. Jiangxi Zhongyiyao. 5: 46-47.
24. Manabe N, Sugimoto M, et al. 1996. Effects of the mycelial extract.
25. Liu P, Zhu J, Huang Y, Liu C. 1996. Influence of Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc. And rat serum containing same medicine on IL-1, IFN and TNF produced by rat Kupffer. China J. Chin. Materia Medica. 21: 367-69.
26. Zhu JL, Liu C. 1992. Modulating effects of extractum semen Persicae and cultivated Cordyceps hyphae on immuno-dysfunction of in-patints with post-hepatitis cirrhosis. Chung-Kuo Chung His I Chieh Ho Tsa Chih. 12:207-09.
27. 2. Dai G, Bao T, Xu C, Cooper R, Zhu JS. CordyMax Cs-4 improves steady-state bioenergy status in mouse liver. J Altern Complement Med. 2001 Jun;7(3):231-40.
28. 5. Zhao CS, Yin WT, Wang JY, Zhang Y, Yu H, Cooper R, Smidt C, Zhu JS. CordyMax Cs-4 improves glucose metabolism and increases insulin sensitivity in normal rats. J Altern Complement Med. 2002 Jun;8(3):309-14.
29. 1. Hsu CC, Huang YL, Tsai SJ, Sheu CC, Huang BM. In vivo and in vitro stimulatory effects of Cordyceps sinensis on testosterone production in mouse Leydig cells. Life Sci. 2003 Sep 5;73(16):2127-36.
30. 3. Wang SM, Lee LJ, Lin WW, Chang CM. Effects of a water-soluble extract of Cordyceps sinensis on steroidogenesis and capsular morphology of lipid droplets in cultured rat adrenocortical cells. J Cell Biochem. 1998 Jun 15;69(4):483-9.
31. 7. Koh JH, Yu KW, Suh HJ, Choi YM, Ahn TS. Activation of macrophages and the intestinal immune system by an orally administered decoction from cultured mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2002 Feb;66(2):407-11.
32. 10. Koh JH, Kim JM, Chang UJ, Suh HJ. Hypocholesterolemic effect of hot-water extract from mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis. Biol Pharm Bull. 2003 Jan;26(1):84-7.
33. 6. Huang BM, Hsu CC, Tsai SJ, Sheu CC, Leu SF. Effects of Cordyceps sinensis on testosterone production in normal mouse Leydig cells. Life Sci. 2001 Oct 19;69(22):2593-602.
34. 17. Zhou DH, Lin LZ. [Effect of Jinshuibao capsule on the immunological function of 36 patients with advanced cancer]. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. 1995 Aug;15(8):476-8.
35. 18. Chen YJ, Shiao MS, Lee SS, Wang SY. Effect of Cordyceps sinensis on the proliferation and differentiation of human leukemic U937 cells. Life Sci. 1997;60(25):2349-59.
36. 19. Nakamura K, Yamaguchi Y, Kagota S, Kwon YM, Shinozuka K, Kunitomo M. Inhibitory effect of Cordyceps sinensis on spontaneous liver metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma and B16 melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. Jpn J Pharmacol. 1999 Mar;79(3):335-41.
37. 20. Gong HY, Wang KQ, Tang SG. [Effects of cordyceps sinensis on T lymphocyte subsets and hepatofibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B] Hunan Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao. 2000 Jun 28;25(3):248-50. [abstract] [medline]
38. 21. Liu YK, Shen W. Inhibitive effect of cordyceps sinensis on experimental hepatic fibrosis and its possible mechanism. World J Gastroenterol. 2003 Mar;9(3):529-33. [medline]
39. 22. Kuo YC, Tsai WJ, Wang JY, Chang SC, Lin CY, Shiao MS. Regulation of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids cell function by the immunomodulatory agents from Cordyceps sinensis. Life Sci. 2001 Jan 19;68(9):1067-82.
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Postby fredrikw » Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:15 pm

never heard of it...

but, anything that sounds almost too good to be true, usually is. not that I'm saying that this isn't true, but you must admit that it do seem to cure a whole lot of things. also, everything that claims to be antiaging also raises my immediate suspicion..

or perhaps I'm just narrow minded and cynical :lol:
--- non-racers. the emptiness of those lives shocks me ---
User avatar
fredrikw
Site Admin
 
Posts: 10719
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2004 12:46 pm
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Postby m_langlois01 » Mon Sep 11, 2006 9:40 pm

Never tried it, but I think it will work, unless you already have a high libido, a high blood testosterone level, a "relatively" high level of leukocytes...

As Jean Chretien once said: "A proof is a proof. What kind of a proof? It's a proof. A proof is a proof. And when you have a good proof, it's because it's proven"!
m_langlois01
 

Re: Cordyceps - heard of em?

Postby ultra_whippet » Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:01 pm

[quote="Dave Noisy"]
In 1993, China's Wan Jun-Sha broke the 10,000 meter world record by an amazing 40 seconds at the World Track and Field meet in Stuttgart, Germany. She was suspected of using illegal steroids because of the huge time improvement. After extensive drug testing, she was cleared, and it was revealed that she was only using Cordyceps and other Chinese herbs.


Hmmmm.... so why aren't all distance runners using it, and why have no other Chinese runners come close to that time since? Sorry, it's just that I'm really cynical about that particular world record :evil:

Anyhow, I have heard of this stuff before (along with the wild claims) but I don't know of anyone that's tried it. Maybe you could be our guinea pig Dave :)
User avatar
ultra_whippet
Active Member
 
Posts: 2626
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 6:36 pm
Location: Somerset, UK

Postby Dave Noisy » Tue Sep 12, 2006 7:00 pm

Some good q's, hopefully the author will sign-up and respond. =)
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Postby Gelert » Tue Sep 12, 2006 7:16 pm

Seems promising. I'll ask my PhD supervisor about it, as he's a fully paid up mycologist and suitable sceptic generally but a bit into alternative medicine. Meh.
User avatar
Gelert
Active Member
 
Posts: 6931
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 10:19 pm

Postby Dave Noisy » Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:29 pm

[quote="Gelert"]Seems promising. I'll ask my PhD supervisor about it, as he's a fully paid up mycologist and suitable sceptic generally but a bit into alternative medicine. Meh.

Didya ever hear back on this?

I've started taking them, started a week ago..i think i'm feeling a bit more energy than usual...might have been the sunny streak tho. ;)

Here's some more info that another TCM doctor sent me - note that while traditionally cordyceps come from caterpillar casings, the ones i get are grown in a lab in Hawaii, and are totally vegan:

DONG CHING XIA CAO

Pharmaceutical Name (Latin)
Cordyceps sinensis

Common Names
Chinese Caterpillar Fungus

Description of Plants
A composite consisting of the stroma of the fungus parasitized on the larve of some species of insects (Fam. Hepialidae) and the dead caterpillar
Part (s) of Plant used

Whole
Key Biochemical Constituents

Proteins, various amino acids, 3'-deoxyadenosin cordycepin, Cordycepic acid, essential fatty acids, non-essential fatty acids, etc
Nature of herbs

Sweet taste, neutral in nature

How it works?

* Tonify the lungs and kidneys
* Arrest bleeding
* Reduce phlegm accumulation

Common Indications

* Chronic cough and asthma
* Hemaptysis in phthisis
* Impotence & seminal emission
* Backache and aching of loins and knees

Dong Chong Xia Cao Properties: SWEET - WARM
Chinese Caterpillar Fungus Meridian : KIDNEY, LUNG

Orally Dong Chong Xia Cao / Cordyceps is used for strengthening the immune system, for reducing the effects of aging, promoting longevity, treating lethargy, and improving liver function in people with hepatitis B. It is also used to treat coughs, chronic bronchitis, respiratory disorders, kidney disorders, frequent nocturia, male sexual dysfunction, anemia, heart arrhythmias, high cholesterol, liver disorders, dizziness, weakness, tinnitus, wasting, and opium addiction. It is also used as a stimulant, a tonic, and an adaptogen which is used to increase energy, enhance stamina, and reduce fatigue.
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Postby Gelert » Sat Jan 06, 2007 11:57 am

[quote="Dave Noisy"][quote="Gelert"]Seems promising. I'll ask my PhD supervisor about it, as he's a fully paid up mycologist and suitable sceptic generally but a bit into alternative medicine. Meh.

Didya ever hear back on this?
]

He's a been a bit stressed for the last couple of months and prone to give me random experiments to do (on my days off), so I have been avoiding him a little but I will tackle him next week.
User avatar
Gelert
Active Member
 
Posts: 6931
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 10:19 pm
Top

Postby Dave Noisy » Sun Jan 07, 2007 12:57 am

Cool beans..i'll let you know if there's any more change on my end. ;)
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Postby geoffbastin » Wed Feb 14, 2007 2:53 am

[quote="Dave Noisy"]Cool beans..i'll let you know if there's any more change on my end. ;)


Any feedback on this, Dave?

and, what's your brand, and source? Thanks!
User avatar
geoffbastin
New Member
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:56 pm
Top

Postby Dave Noisy » Wed Feb 14, 2007 3:21 am

[quote="geoffbastin"][quote="Dave Noisy"]Cool beans..i'll let you know if there's any more change on my end. ;)


Any feedback on this, Dave?

and, what's your brand, and source? Thanks!

Heya - hmmm...tough to say, tho i'd say overall i feel like i've got more power to spare.. I'm at the total wrong end of my spectrum to really 'notice' anything.

The kind i'm getting is grown in a lab in Hawaii - it's supposed to be topnotch..
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC
Top

Cordyceps Mushrooms

Postby RawRawRaw » Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:38 pm

I am taking an amazing product called "Raw Greens Meal" which contains cordyceps mushrooms as well as many other organic, raw mushrooms, grains, sea plants, veggies etc. I don't like to take synthetic or heat extracted products, so I do not take any cordyceps extracts.

I feel an amazing increase in energy which I personally attribute partially to the cordyceps. My question is, are there different strains of cordyceps other than sinensis? Are the effects/benefits similar? I can't find any info on this wonderful plant that is in English.
RawRawRaw
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:33 pm

Re: Cordyceps Mushrooms

Postby Dave Noisy » Wed Feb 28, 2007 2:34 am

Heya,
[quote="RawRawRaw"]I am taking an amazing product called "Raw Greens Meal" which contains cordyceps mushrooms as well as many other organic, raw mushrooms, grains, sea plants, veggies etc. I don't like to take synthetic or heat extracted products, so I do not take any cordyceps extracts.

The cordyceps i'm taking are also a 'whole food' - not sure if they're 'raw', but it's the whole mushroom, ground up.

Is there a URL for this product? Curious to see what else is in there..

[quote]I feel an amazing increase in energy which I personally attribute partially to the cordyceps. My question is, are there different strains of cordyceps other than sinensis? Are the effects/benefits similar? I can't find any info on this wonderful plant that is in English.

It's my understanding that this'd be the one to take..

As a further update, i think i'm starting to notice some more of the benefits... As my intensity is picking up, i'm feeling like i'm progressing much faster than i have in the past..and i continue to have plenty of energy for my workouts...i'm likin' it!
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC
Top

Raw Greens

Postby RawRawRaw » Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:01 pm

I checked and the ingredients aren't on the website, but its has grains (rice, millet, barley) greens (chlorella, spirulina, barleygrass, kale) and other veggies and herbs to make a complete meal. I like that it has Shiitake and ganoderm mushrooms too, along with the cordyceps. They freeze everything to dry it so the enzymes aren't cooked out of it.

I first got turned onto this by a friend of mine who is a marathon runner. He doesn't know anything about chinese herbs but when he started taking it he said he had more stamina right away. I'm not a professional but I like to work out and I also noticed I could do more reps each set and stay at the gym longer when i take this. I've been a raw foodist for years and I never took food replacements before because they cook the ingredients, and there's usually animal byproducts. This ones vegann and organic, plus it doesn't contain fake supplements. I take it for breakfast with a banana every day now and I'm going to try their other products soon.

I checked the website but the ingredients aren't there. I just read them off the box but they'll probably tell you the ingredients if you email them. Theres tons of good info on the site though, and it explains about enzymes and raw foods, which everyone should be educating themselves about.

www.rawgreens.com

Question: Do you get your cordyceps at a chinese herbal store or is there somewhere i can buy whole cordyceps in capsules?
RawRawRaw
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:33 pm

Postby Dave Noisy » Thu Mar 01, 2007 6:09 am

Interesting site - they've put a bit of money into this..heh.. No mention of cordyceps here tho:

http://rawgreens.com/dictionary/

I get mine from a buddy as capsules. Not sure if he gets 'em that way, or deals with the powder..
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Next

Return to Vegan Products and Supplements

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest