How long did it take to build your fitness levels?

All other sports and activities not mentioned above!

Moderators: hardcore iv, fredrikw, JP, stateofflux, bronco

How long did it take to build your fitness levels?

Postby purple_mog » Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:02 pm

This might be a little of an odd question, but I'd be really curious to know roughly how long anyone felt it took for them to go from moderate/normal fitness levels to a 'good' level of fitness once you started consciously training etc?

Am asking because I was feeling a bit disheartened at what I felt was my lack of progress, but was then reminded that I've only been actively training with a plan and goals properly for about 2 months :roll:

would love to hear your experiences :idea:
The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.

Mahatma Gandhi
User avatar
purple_mog
Active Member
 
Posts: 248
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 8:16 am
Location: York, UK

Re: How long did it take to build your fitness levels?

Postby xrodolfox » Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:41 pm

[quote="purple_mog"]This might be a little of an odd question, but I'd be really curious to know roughly how long anyone felt it took for them to go from moderate/normal fitness levels to a 'good' level of fitness once you started consciously training etc?

Am asking because I was feeling a bit disheartened at what I felt was my lack of progress, but was then reminded that I've only been actively training with a plan and goals properly for about 2 months :roll:

would love to hear your experiences :idea:


I think that this question depends mostly (but not exclusively) on four variables.

1) Level of fitness BEFORE unfitness

2) Level of unfitness when working out began.

3) GOAL fitness

4) training efficiency (ie. time, availibity of coaches and support staff, teams and partners, knowledge of training, type of exercise, etc.)

Of these, before a person responds, it would make sense to know at least the background to these questions before a response, or the response won't be contextualized.
Last edited by xrodolfox on Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"The worker has the right to leave his boss, but can she do it? And if she does quit him, is it in order to lead a free life; where she will have no master but herself? No, she leaves to sell herself to another employer. She's driven by the same hunger. Thus the worker's liberty is only a theoretical freedom, lacking any means of realization; an utter falsehood."
-Bakunin
User avatar
xrodolfox
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3577
Joined: Mon Jul 31, 2006 7:29 pm
Location: Eugene, OR

Postby xrodolfox » Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:56 pm

Answering your question with my rubrick:

1) I was a competive swimmer all my life before I took a 5 year haitus. I weighed 175lbs during my last year of competition (in H20 Polo). Aerobically, I used to be able to swim 100m lc in less than 59 seconds using butterfly.

2) I went up to 210lbs before starting working out again. At the start of my swimming again, I could hardly swim 100m in 1:45 doing freestyle, and I couldn't even do a 50m fly without breaking into single arm butterfly.

3) My goal in getting back in the pool was to be able to compete in my AG in swimming again. That didn't mean doing a 58 100m fly, but it did mean being top three in my AG in my state... which translated to about 1:10 or less in a 100m fly.

My short term goal was to move to the "fast lane" in the Masters team from the "middle lane" where I started.

4) When I began, I had some knowlege of training as a participant, but not as a coach. I knew how to follow orders, and I knew that if I showed up regularly, I'd see results. I didn't know how to design a successful workout plan. However, I did have resources in that I had a team to swim with and folks that soon became friends that helped keep me on track. I also had the time to train.

The results:

It took me two months to go from the bottom of the middle lane to the bottom of the fastest lane. I'd moved up two lanes, or about 20 seconds faster per 100m interval by the end of the summer.

It took 8 months for me to get to the top of the fastest lane (a drop of about 8 more seconds per 100). In the process, I lost about 20lbs.

It two two years to swim at the top of my AG in statewide competitons. My first year I swam a 1:15 100m fly, and my second year I made top three with a 1:07m lc fly.

That took two years.

Since then, I've been better, and worse. However, I've not had to work that hard since I've not let myself get to zero. Luckily, I had a lot of muscle memory with swimming.

My training for running, on the other hand, has been much harder, and I'm in excellent shape right now. My muscles just don't know how to run, and it is much harder teaching them that at 32 than it was re-learning swimmig which my muscles know how to do from doing it for the majority of my life.

How long it takes to get back in shape depends on quite a lot of factors. I've seen amazing athletes NEVER get into swimming shape, and I've seen people who go from couch potato to US AG record holder in a matter of months. It all depends.

Comparing yourself to folks who've got too many factors differently from yours won't help. You need to compare apples to apples and not oranges.
Last edited by xrodolfox on Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"The worker has the right to leave his boss, but can she do it? And if she does quit him, is it in order to lead a free life; where she will have no master but herself? No, she leaves to sell herself to another employer. She's driven by the same hunger. Thus the worker's liberty is only a theoretical freedom, lacking any means of realization; an utter falsehood."
-Bakunin
User avatar
xrodolfox
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3577
Joined: Mon Jul 31, 2006 7:29 pm
Location: Eugene, OR

Postby Dave Noisy » Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:59 pm

Ah geez.. I'd say it took a good couple years before i was a 'decent' level of fitness on the track, and another couple years to be pretty darn competitive. (At least, at a Provincial [state] level.)

It's hard to gauge this, some people are happy being able to get up a flight of stairs without breathing heavy..in competitive sport, what's 'good'?
User avatar
Dave Noisy
Active Member
 
Posts: 6767
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:04 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Postby purple_mog » Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:21 pm

yeah I knew it was a weird/odd question, but thankyou for trying to answer it! and Yes Rodolfo your answer was great, I just didn't want to ask too many personal questions!
The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.

Mahatma Gandhi
User avatar
purple_mog
Active Member
 
Posts: 248
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 8:16 am
Location: York, UK

Re: How long did it take to build your fitness levels?

Postby purple_mog » Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:58 pm

Oh and I should really answer for myself too!

[quote]1) Level of fitness BEFORE unfitness

Varied quite a bit but last time I did any actual training was about age 15/16yrs for short distance biathlons (bike/run). Have always walked a fair bit but wouldn't say I had anything beyond ordinary fitness levels, although not a total couch potato either. Had several years of enforced inactivity due to back problems and knee problems too.
Never been esp good at any sports.

Weight has fluctuated a lot, mostly due to binge eating and some other stuff. Still a wee bit of an ongoing challenge.

[quote]2) Level of unfitness when working out began.


Started training properly about two months ago but was steadily increasing my exercise from the new year and started a very steady walk/run program about a year ago. Ran my first cani-x 5k in April this year - felt very hard!
In May walked the Yorkshire 3 Peaks (26miles over 3 hills) and found it not as hard as I expected so all the walking training did pay off.

[quote]3) GOAL fitness


To be able to complete a sprint tri in 2009, a 10k in 2009, an Olympic distance tri in 2010, and most importantly make tri training part of my life. To reduce my weight and bodyfat (and look like a proper fit person! yes I know thats very shallow)

[quote]4) training efficiency (ie. time, availibity of coaches and support staff, teams and partners, knowledge of training, type of exercise, etc.)


I have limited time due to working full time, living on my own with two dogs and have a PhD to complete while also doing voluntary work for animal charities and starting up compassionate training classes. BUT running is something I can potentially do far more of because I can share it with my dogs.

I have a very very good friend who is an experienced triathlete (recently completed yet another Ironman) who has given me some great advice and support. I'm using books to explore training plans and nutrition. Might be able to join a running group in the winter, have found a masters swim group but can't go as not free on the only night they train.

So far I have improved my 5k time by over 5mins from last year, have done the full sprint distance in training as a trial run, and have managed to make exercise part of my daily routine. Have dropped about 5lbs in 2 months.

Does this sound reasonable?
The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.

Mahatma Gandhi
User avatar
purple_mog
Active Member
 
Posts: 248
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 8:16 am
Location: York, UK
Top

Postby Alistar » Wed Aug 19, 2009 5:14 am

Usually it takes me about 2months of decent training( at least 3times a week) to get back reasonable fitness on my bike. The 2nd month about 5rides a week. Then another month of intense rides to get the strength/speed neccessary to be competitive at a local non-elite level...

At the moment I'm doing 1 ride a week and bonk(or hit the wall) after around 60ks (not too hilly) . Did 90k's in the weekend and it took me 3hr50.
When fit can do the same ride in just under 3hrs- with no sign of that damned bloody wall I keep on wacking into!

But I reckon you shouldn't worry at all about body weight. Just keep following your programme, aim to get slightly faster or better at what you are doing, and the body will take care of itself :)
Alistar
Active Member
 
Posts: 1472
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 8:00 am
Location: New Zealand

Postby israel » Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:21 am

To reduce my weight and bodyfat - now if i train for a month im good

but to go from fat to ok it took me 7 months of working out and i saw the changes at the 6 months to traning but when i saw im skinnier it was drastic so keep traning and if by the 6 month you dont see a change then you can quit traning and go eat ice cream and some peanut butter! in front of the tv!!

weight is tricky cause you also gain muscle mass- when i trained just to loose weight then it droped after a month but i couldnt see the visual changes till the 6 month!

so if your weight dosnt get lower then you should worry !
User avatar
israel
Active Member
 
Posts: 906
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 7:19 pm

Postby JohnBarleycorn » Wed Aug 19, 2009 7:07 am

After a ten year break, it took me three years to get fit. That was training hard, seven days a week, with a coach.

But I am quite old now, and had been pretty idle over the ten years, so I expected it to take a while.

But I had a reasonable level of fitness after six months. The fitter you get, the harder it is to get fitter.
I eat to nourish my compassion, not my greed

I'm the man they couldn't kill ! I cannot be destroyed with conventional weapons !

And probably the former fastest British Vegan 10, 25 and 50 mile TT rider. Probably.
User avatar
JohnBarleycorn
Active Member
 
Posts: 2270
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 2:45 pm
Location: All over the world !

Postby Clem Snide » Wed Aug 19, 2009 8:52 pm

My fitness and conditioning improved slowly and gradually over about four years, then suddenly went through the roof in the last 12 months.
User avatar
Clem Snide
Active Member
 
Posts: 1208
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:55 pm

Re: How long did it take to build your fitness levels?

Postby BlueRose » Thu Sep 03, 2009 1:58 pm

[quote="purple_mog"]This might be a little of an odd question, but I'd be really curious to know roughly how long anyone felt it took for them to go from moderate/normal fitness levels to a 'good' level of fitness once you started consciously training etc?

Am asking because I was feeling a bit disheartened at what I felt was my lack of progress, but was then reminded that I've only been actively training with a plan and goals properly for about 2 months :roll:

would love to hear your experiences :idea:


It typically takes me about 1-2 months before I see a definite change in my metabolism, then another 3-6 to see a change in my fitness levels.

Usually it's measurable. When I began I was a total fitness n00b, hadn't worked out even beyond gym class. I averaged about 4 mph on the elliptical. After 6 months I had dropped 30 lbs and was up to almost 7 mph, and I was on there for about 45-60 minutes daily. I started out at 20-30 min daily.

Getting back into shape, I'm happy to realize I'm not THAT bad--I'm averaging about 5/5.5 mph on the elliptical and I'm not killing myself. That's good!
User avatar
BlueRose
Active Member
 
Posts: 821
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:56 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Top

Postby JuicyJ » Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:51 am

I have read that it takes a newbie woman 3-6 months to see muscles in the gym.
Genetics play a huge part in the equation.They will effect where and when you develop muscles (and endurance).There are other factors too ( ie. training - duh) .
My sister had a well developed upper body before she started lifting . I had the legs esp. quads of an athlete before I started training and a wimpy upper body.I really had to really work on that.
She could never do the dry land cardio training I managed to do-genetics :wink: .
Together we would have made the perfect competitive body builder.
I know smokers that train very little and can run marathons. Most people, I think, cannot.


I have been training seriously since I was 12-15.
At 17 I did 8 mile "runs" .I can't call them races. I didn't win :wink: .
I skied freestyle during this time ( and pawtied a bit;))
Having done this for 20 years or a little more now (yikes!!!) , has given me a big big advantage.
It all leads to muscle memory ,mature muscles and improved conditioning. You have walked a marathon-no small achievement .That is awesome !
You will be there soon enough.
Even when taking time off for injuries and I have done that a lot , I come back and get fit quickly. You will too.


PATIENCE and CONSISTENCY along with the work are your friends- even if you are not seeing the immediate results you desire .

If you don't think you aren't doing enough ( one of the biggest mistakes out of the gate, and a big contributor to over training and quitting ), you are. it is still a workout .Less is more.More is more(with problems ).
Do something even if it just a stretch.
It all ad's up to that consistency thing ,discipline, and better training times.
Of course you will need to up the work load to compete.


Everyday is a new challenge so be kind to you.
Give yourself time , be thankful and work hard and enjoy.
Listen to what that very wise body tells you - especially the knees and back !!!


Peace - Good Luck


I can be so long winded :roll:
Last edited by JuicyJ on Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
JuicyJ
Active Member
 
Posts: 376
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 4:55 pm

Postby BlueRose » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:29 am

I exercise to tone, lose weight and once down to ideal, stay in shape. Beyond my calves since I do a lot of walking and biking, I don't really have much muscle definition, nor do I want it.

It was really weird seeing the muscles in my legs develop though!
User avatar
BlueRose
Active Member
 
Posts: 821
Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:56 pm
Location: Boston, MA

Postby seasiren » Fri Sep 04, 2009 2:36 pm

Still ongoing, but:

couple months visible difference regarding weight, noticible difference in not getting as winded

6 mo - feeling remarkably better

1 yr. - looking healthy, feeling good, decided to take it to the next level

1yr 6 mo - competed on stage

2 years - best shape of my life

Now: always wanting to improve.

I think you can realistically see a big difference in your health in approx 12 weeks if you stick to the plan. It only gets better from there :)
seasiren
Active Member
 
Posts: 2074
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2005 4:39 am

Postby EceGled » Sat Jan 02, 2010 4:59 am

I'm a newb at fitness, but I will say that I am not focused on an endpoint type of goal for now. I am judging achievement on growth from where I am, how long I manage to keep it up, and how much I learn in the process. It really only takes 2-3 days of working out to begin to see progress in the first measurement: strength and endurance gain, energy level, etc.
To become vegetarian is to step into the stream which leads to nirvana. -Buddha
my blog: culture, politics, and animals
User avatar
EceGled
Active Member
 
Posts: 358
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 1:34 pm
Location: heben

Next

Return to Other Sports and General Fitness

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron