Keeping track of body fat percentages and weight

Lifting weights whether for bodybuilding, toning, or just for general fitness.

Moderators: hardcore iv, fredrikw, JP, stateofflux, bronco

Keeping track of body fat percentages and weight

Postby tylerm » Thu Aug 05, 2004 4:12 pm

Do any of you have one of those scales that gives your body fat percentage and weight? I was thinking about getting one, to keep track of my amount of lean muscle, and make sure I keep steady gains and don't backtrack at all.. Some of the cheaper ones I have seen say they are only for inactive to moderately active adults? They have models that are more expensive for 'athletes', maybe they are more accurate or something? They listed athletes as someone who has 6 hours or more of exercise a week and a resting heart rate of 60 or less.

What other methods for body fat? Calipers, but are those accurate?

Any info appreciated!
User avatar
tylerm
Moderator
 
Posts: 2136
Joined: Fri May 21, 2004 5:50 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Postby PaHulkster » Thu Aug 05, 2004 11:08 pm

It seems like calipers would be more accurate, but I have nothing to back that up. There are chambers you can go into that test your body fat, but they're expensive. I wonder how they work, though.
PaHulkster
 

Postby funfetus » Fri Aug 06, 2004 1:32 am

Calipers are supposed to be fairly accurate, but only when used by someone who knows what they're doing. I get the feeling that the calipers I use seriously underestimate my bodyfat (says I'm like 8%), but as long as I make sure to take the measurement in the same place every time, at least I know if I've lost or gained any.
funfetus
Active Member
 
Posts: 663
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 2:02 am
Location: Covina, CA

Postby JP » Fri Aug 06, 2004 6:25 am

The scales are judged very inaccurate everywhere i hear them mentioned. Too many variables affect it, like your hydration levels.

What are your goals tylerm? Do you really need to know your bodyfat?
User avatar
JP
Site Admin
 
Posts: 19190
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2004 4:14 pm
Location: Berlin, Germany

Postby tylerm » Fri Aug 06, 2004 3:41 pm

No, the bodyfat thing isnt a big deal. I don't have very much bodyfat, it was just something I think would be interesting to be able to watch as I continue to work out, lean muscle compared to fat. But if they are inaccurate, I wouldn't waste my time..
User avatar
tylerm
Moderator
 
Posts: 2136
Joined: Fri May 21, 2004 5:50 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Postby Mary » Fri Aug 06, 2004 6:22 pm

What should a female body builders fat levels be like anyway? I am pretty certain that mine is miles over! But I would like to know what to aim at. (So I know how long I will need to starve in order to cut, a year and a half from now. Thanks for that Pete! :evil: Just realised.)
User avatar
Mary
Active Member
 
Posts: 4623
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2004 6:37 pm
Location: Midlands

Postby Renecarol25 » Fri Aug 06, 2004 6:38 pm

I think below 10% is dangerous for women. And its something like 5% for men where it starts to get dangerous.
User avatar
Renecarol25
Active Member
 
Posts: 1093
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2004 6:15 pm
Location: North Carolina USA

Postby Mary » Fri Aug 06, 2004 7:13 pm

I am probably well away from the danger zone! :lol:
User avatar
Mary
Active Member
 
Posts: 4623
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2004 6:37 pm
Location: Midlands

Postby Karma » Wed Aug 11, 2004 1:06 am

I bought a scale that supposedly measure body fat from the skymall catalogue. It claimed to be one of the most accurate (it was about 70 bucks I think). but honestly, I don't think it's accurate. I was pretty lean and toned this summer and it still measured me at 19%. I can't believe I was that high in body fat considering how thin I was, and how strong at the same time. But who knows- maybe there are good scales out there. I think calipers are the way to go though..
Karma
New Member
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2004 12:56 am
Location: Tampa, Fl

Calipers

Postby sensless » Wed Aug 11, 2004 3:43 am

Hello everyone, I just jumped over here from the powerlifting board to take a look what info I could find here.

With regards to the calipers, I have owned two different pairs and used to use them when I was a personal trainer some time ago (seems like a lifetime ago). Calipers are consistenly accurate, they are usually never more than 1% off of the water tank method, which I hear is supposed to be the most accurate. They are relatively easy to use on another person, but measuring yourself is impossible, plus you have to be willing to really pinch a person in some places-the thigh really requires uncomfortable pinching to grab the non-muscle portion, to have an accurate reading.

Depending whether you are a female or a male, you measure different locations. Charts are sometimes included with calipers that detail what needs to be done, but often these are incomplete. If you go to a gym that has a personal trainer, you could let them know you purchased a caliper and ask them to show you how to use it. I'm sure they won't mind, I wouldn't.

To sum up, I definately recommend calipers as a way to measure your bodyfat and gains (or losses).

-----

For female bodyfat levels for just an athletic individual I think that 14%-18% is a fantastic range to maintain. When I used to follow bodybuilding in the early to mid 90's I believe the female body builders were coming in around 8% or so, and I remember Big Lou saying he was around 2%-3% bodyfat when he entered the olympia at 40 or 44 years of age. That level really messes with a woman's body and I wouldn't recommend it unless you are competing. For a guy I think that 8%-12% is a good athletic level, though if you have a naturally lean build it is perfectly safe in the 6%-8% range, the 2%-3% offers some health risks if maintained.

Those are my two cents, which may actually be worth less.

Regards,

John Jr.
poop.
User avatar
sensless
Active Member
 
Posts: 1081
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 8:43 pm
Location: Wisconsin


Return to Bodybuilding and Training with Weights

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest