deaths on runs

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deaths on runs

Postby JP » Mon Sep 19, 2005 8:46 am

Are deaths on runs really common? I just noticed this on BBC news about a race held last weekend:

[quote]
A Northumbria Police spokesman said: "I can confirm four male participants in the race have died, which is more than the usual one or two - but every year more people are taking part."


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tyne/4259174.stm

so every year "one or two" die? That sounds crazy :D

This race was a half marathon...
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Postby runner » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:13 am

Guess running gets so big that there are also people who die..

yesthurday at the 10M run 30.000 people joined..

my pc loggs of in 1 minute

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Postby ultra_whippet » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:52 am

I guess on a run that size you are bound to get a few charity runners who are very unfit/unprepared, also maybe there are some people with heart conditions etc. that they weren't aware of. Plus if the weather is hot you can get the odd person dying of hypoatraemia.
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Postby runner » Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:24 am

on the uni there are 15 minute computers.. for people who just need to print.. there are a couple of hundred others but they are busy

but i think the whole debate is started by some people to tell people not to run. I think that when you've got problems with your heart you can use a cardio watch and should talk to a doctor..

but these things happen also with people who walk on the street...
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:39 am

i lost a friend like this last year, he was extremely fit and trained well. he'd done big runs before, just this time he collapsed and died half a mile from the end of a half marathon. it was a heart problem, the first symptom was death, and like the doctor said, that's a very hard symptom to deal with. (and brian really wouldn't have minded that joke :D )

yes, deaths on these runs happen regularly, not sure if you can call them common though, considering the number of people involved.
It's not what you do occasionally that makes a difference, it's that which you do everyday that brings progress.

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Postby runner » Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:59 am

Who

I'm sorry to hear this.

Guess besides the tragedy from the individual cases there is not a big group..
What might be a good idea is that all people do a test (not just runners,...)
It's hard to tell if people who have serious hard problems would have a diferent future without running, but there might be posibilities for medical actions. the last years a couple of footbal players in europe diet on the field as well.
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Postby floraluna » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:51 pm

It's always very sad, I think, when someone dies during an event- people die every day doing all different things and during a gathering of tens of thousands of runners, I don't think it is statistically surprising that one or more people will die, particularly if they have a condition that is aggravated by strenuous activity.
I think it is interesting (though tragic, too) when elite runners die during or after hard effort and it is only then discovered that they had, for example, serious heart disease, or some other very life threatening condition, without knowing it.

I have heard the argument that with such a risk, nobody should run/bike/etc. etc. Of course, I think this is absurd- exercise, even long endurance exercise when done correctly, is a very healthy part of many people's lives. Of course we should not push ourselves to the limit where we are risking death. But, I think it is amazing that through exercise, many people with serious physical conditions never know it because they are SO healthy and in such good shape otherwise. I don't think quality of life would be improved by being too overly cautious. While eating healthy and exercising the right amount will reduce our risk of many diseases, it of course does not eliminate our chances of dying unexpectedly, just like anyone out there has a chance of this happening. People die every day. When it is while running a marathon, the deeath is often attributed directly to the running. When it happens on the couch at home, rarely is it attributed to the couch.

I'm rambling :-) but I've thought a lot about this lately, and I guess I just think that if someone dies doing what they love, while it is very sad and we should all watch out to take care of ourselves so this does not happen, I consider that much better than if they died sitting by, too afraid to do the things they loved. I hope I take my statement to heart as I grow older, slow down, have more aches and pains, and perhaps become sick. My mom died of cancer when I was in high school and the thing that killed her spirit (as cancer killed her body) was being confined primarily to a bed, unable to hike, backpack, garden, even just walk through the neighborhoods, and unable to visit the mountains. I would rather she could have continued these activities to the end, and died a little earlier, than sat by and watched as her soul slowly escaped.
Sorry for the heavy post! I didn't intend to get so off topic!

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Postby Dave Noisy » Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:45 am

A-HA!!

I *knew* running was bad too!!

Scratch swimming and running.. Yay, i can stick to cycling. =)
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Postby littlegirlbunny » Tue Sep 20, 2005 7:33 am

I completely agree with you floraluna. Great post. :D
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Postby silver » Tue Sep 20, 2005 2:00 pm

[quote]When it happens on the couch at home, rarely is it attributed to the couch.

:D :D :D
[quote]Of course we should not push ourselves to the limit where we are risking death.

Why not? It's our own life.
How else can we find out where these limits are and therefore, what we are capable of? Death is part of life, and you can't fully embrace one without the other. (my personal belief.)
It's not what you do occasionally that makes a difference, it's that which you do everyday that brings progress.

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Postby runner » Tue Sep 20, 2005 5:05 pm

[quote]Quote:
Of course we should not push ourselves to the limit where we are risking death.

Why not? It's our own life.
How else can we find out where these limits are and therefore, what we are capable of? Death is part of life, and you can't fully embrace one without the other. (my personal belief.)


guess it dpends on the definition and on wat knoledge you have..

if you know something is wrong it's suecide.. that's not the same as when it just happens.. but i agree that we should decide over our own lifes. When we can get the knoledge we can make a decision baced on that
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Postby floraluna » Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:29 pm

I too think that I should (and do) have the right (without being blamed of selfishly risking myself and thus risking those around me emotionally) to push myself to whatever level I want. I completely agree that unless we go to those extremes, we never know how much we are capable of. But perhaps there is a limit to how far to push. that is different for every person. I hope most people can make the right decisions if they are pushing to the point of truly risking life. Is it really worth dying to prove something? Or just coming close?
Judging from past experiences where I have had to make decisions about how far to go (particularly in mountaineering and climbing settings), I have found out two things about myself:
1. There's a point that I won't let myself go beyond. When my mind or my instinct decide that what I am doing is seriously jeopardizing my health or safety, it sort of takes over. Survival mechanism, I guess, but I still truly wonder up to what point I am mentally able to over-rule that survival mechanism. I'm not sure I need to try to find out, because it has served me well.
2. Letting that instinct kick in makes getting out of tough situations a lot easier. Perhaps it's just a matter of letting go of some of the constructed network we live within, leaving a little logic behind and letting my body sense what it can and cannot do.

When I commented "Of course, we shouldn't push ourselves to the point of being in danger of dying..." I guess I was thinking about some specific situations where I hope that people most often make the choice to ensure their well-being, for example, during kidney failure in a 100 mile run- really the only thing to do is to stop running. I would not condemn someone who made a different decision, but I would probably judge the decision (I don't really like that about myself).

At any rate, my outdoor and physical pursuits are the most freedom I have in my life. I wouldn't give them up for anything. I think it is very sad when someone dies doing something they love, but as others here have mentioned and echoed, I think the best way to die anyway would be doing something I love.
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