running tips for a newbie!

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running tips for a newbie!

Postby strongereveryday » Thu Mar 04, 2004 10:45 am

hey everyone i have just started running and i would greatly apreciate some overall tips on, among other things.

expanding my lung power, whenever i run i always feel that my body can handle more. My legs dont get very tired but i feel as if im about to throw up a lot of the time and have to stop and dry heave then keep on running. wich is rather infuriating because im ready to go!

any important areas that need to be stretched more then others, i just do an overall quick stretch and dont really push any one place harder.

breathing, i asked advice from a friend and he told me it was better to breath in through your mouth and out through your nose, sounds kind of foolish though, is this true? perhaps just a rumor, i try to just breathe very deep and let it flow.

best foods to eat before a run, i usually dont eat anything for 2-3 hours prior to avoid side cramps.
and best foods after a run to build muscle!
im sorry to ask so many simple questions im sure have simple answers but i'd apreciate some opinions thanks y'all
also this site is very inspiring!
shackles are the one things free for all
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Postby Strix » Thu Mar 04, 2004 12:30 pm

ACK! I would NOT breathe IN through the mouth! Best way is the opposite :!:

IN through the NOSE (should expand your tummy); OUT through the MOUTH (tummy in and tighten).

That's probably one of the most valuable things I learned about running. Made me stronger and aided my endurance.

Anyone have different knowledge?
"The hand that signed the paper felled a city;
Five sovereign fingers taxed the breath,
Doubled the globe of dead and halved a country;
These five kings did a king to death."
-Dylan Thomas
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Postby prefab » Thu Mar 04, 2004 2:08 pm

I agree with strix In nose out mouth so you get that filtration, Hehe. Initially, you may want to run fast fast fast getting all out of breath and everything. Avoid doing this it just burns up your glycogen and teaches your body to burn carbs not fat. Instead, Take it easy and do a combination of run/walk 3mins/1min off for 30mins or less a few times a week. Eventually, get to 30min run straight and sign up for a 5k with a friend or go solo, peeps are always nice. After your done, you'll have that time try and improve upon it by signing up for yet another race to keep you motivated. Get a training program and go for it!!!
Go slow, mind your form- www.posetech.com
warm up, but more importantly do the COOL down!!! keep moving till breathing returns to normal and stretch and resupply 4carb/1protein (liquid is quicker) drink/food within 90mins of workouts.
Breath with your diaphragm-don't work your chest in and out!
If you're not at a conversational level-you're going to hard--increasing lactic acid buildup by working at/near your thresholds. Focus on fat-burn or aerobic levels of cardio--chk your age and get a rough estimate from a heart rate chart. GL

On food/drink before recommendations/digestive limitations--2hrs before small meal or less, 1hr fruit/single item bagel, 30mins (this is good all the time) carbohydrates liquid (green drink, carrot, celery, spinach, parsley, cucumber, fruit juices, gatorade if you must) 5mins before another sip of carbo drink. During exercise, drink water or nothing for workouts less than an hour (tip: check weight before and after a few runs to monitor your water loss. Replace that weight asap when you return water/carbo drinks!)

p.s.-run negative splits-this means run each mile a lil bit faster than the last on a run-teaches you to keep exerting yourself as you inevitably get more fatigued. This is also the best race strategy for shorter distances. If you floor the gas on your car you burn the motor and fuel more quickly than if you go slow and steady-same goes for your bod.
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Postby Strix » Wed Mar 10, 2004 9:58 pm

[quote="prefab"]...
On food/drink before recommendations/digestive limitations--2hrs before small meal or less, 1hr fruit/single item bagel, 30mins (this is good all the time) carbohydrates liquid (green drink, carrot, celery, spinach, parsley, cucumber, fruit juices, gatorade if you must) 5mins before another sip of carbo drink. During exercise, drink water or nothing for workouts less than an hour (tip: check weight before and after a few runs to monitor your water loss. Replace that weight asap when you return water/carbo drinks!)

p.s.-run negative splits-this means run each mile a lil bit faster than the last on a run-teaches you to keep exerting yourself as you inevitably get more fatigued. This is also the best race strategy for shorter distances. If you floor the gas on your car you burn the motor and fuel more quickly than if you go slow and steady-same goes for your bod.


I don't eat before a run any longer, but I used to. I used to eat about 20 minutes before, or even right before! Not much though. It seemed to me that I could feel the carb (I always ate a high carb like a sweet potato) kick in half way through my run! I don't know if it really did; maybe it was just a second wind...

What's the best strategy for long distance? I run 9 miles at a time and find I go faster and faster as well. Many times, I don't want to stop, lol.
"The hand that signed the paper felled a city;
Five sovereign fingers taxed the breath,
Doubled the globe of dead and halved a country;
These five kings did a king to death."
-Dylan Thomas
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long run tips

Postby prefab » Thu Mar 11, 2004 12:31 pm

Hey strixxy lol :)

The key thing here is AVOID activating your carbohydrate burning system-aka anaerboic cycle. This occurs by exceeding about 70% of your heart rate. For the average 30 year old-you wanna keep your heart rate between 120-160bpm to stay in the fat burn and aerobic ranges. If you go anaerboic-your body leaves that slow steady equal burn of protein, fat, and carbohydrates and quickly elevates your carbo burn above the rest. This carbo burn engine in your body will not shutdown for 8-9hours afterwards. So, If aerobic fitness is your goal keep your workout's in that heart rate range and avoid "stomping the gas" on your engine. This is for base periods getting the foundation ready for honing that mileage and speed into some new PR's later in the year. Keeping it in low gear will allow your body to adapt with quality physiological changes key ones for the long run being increased fat metabolization, more capilliries, more mitochondria in the cells (energy production).

So check into some research on your energy systems- ATP/CP cycle which provides cells energy for 7-9secs, anaerboic (45-55sec), beyond that aerobic cycles. So a sprint that lasts 1min15secs, is going to require an anaerboic powerhouse with great aerboic conditioning to carry that last 20 secs when the anaerboic system becomes exhausted.
So keep it low in the off season and instead of getting a heart that is like a honda civic that someone has been racing out every light with high octane/glycemic fuels--be concentrated on form/efficiency, lower glycemic foods will lead you to that acura nsx or whatever lol engine for a heart.

With all that said, longer runs and race strategy's usually boil down to running even split times for each mile or within 10-15secs of them. For marathons, peeps like to break it down to 2- 10mile runs and a 10k finish---where you relax the first 10miles, focus more the second 10 miles, then race the last 6 as a 10k. It varies but I don't recommend surging leave that to the pros.
For half marathons-I usually run for even splits with a being slower at the start (race congestion) and sprint finish.
10k's I run even splits with negative splits the last 2 miles.
For 5k's-I pick a hard pace and try and tack negative split times each successive mile. These are just standard race strategys and will give you a good race with a strong finish-better to pass people at the end than lose 50 spots. lol

On long training runs I give myself plenty of good warmup and then some because even after a mile or so I start getting hot feet and am rearing to go---mantra at this point relax get warm you got plenty to go!!!
Once I get in the main section of the rain, I will do a couple of tempo runs 2-3mile segments about 10-15secs slower than my race pace-I will walk or back-off If i feel myself moving toward thresholds too quickly.
Similarly, I'll run 10-15mins ata time with 30secs-1min slow jog/walk recovery breaks.
I'll plan a particularly hill grinding course if i'm looking for more confidence or strength.
I'll sometimes use regular running shoes (asics kayano about 11ozs.) versus my racing flats (asics magic racer 7ozs.) to help build leg strength and keep my flats feeling ultra fly weight.
Run for time not distance keeps me from focusing on my pace too much unless it's that kind of run
Race all distances every 3 wks under half-marathon "all-out" if I've been being good and not knocking it all out in training as I discussed earlier.
Use that carbo drink/juice/not food about 30minutes before your run, and take carbos and/or water or something with you. Even if you don't eat carbs on the run take water-dehydration will slow you down after about 30minutes. You'll get higher quality workouts at what expense? If short run under 60minutes and not working out again leave stuff at home for most of those my friend but I think long run means more than an hour workout for intermediate to advanced runners.
I break my long runs up usually too as in every other week I do half the long mileage----so week 1-10miles week 2-5miles, week 3-11miles, week 4-5.5miles, week 5-12miles etc.....
Speed before endurance, form through building strength, efficiency by through economical movements, have fun and relax---save the showboat for races hehe

Oh ya keep alkaline. acid slows you down-bad food, going anaerboic, stressing out all these things will put acid in your blood and make you feel slow. Avoid them like the plague and find avenues to keep alkaline.

There is a tribe of people in South America where everyone, and, I mean everyone, runs 76miles from one village to another village in one day as a celebration of life. and no they are not professional runners. model these peeps and their secrets to alkalinity.

www.posetech.com

Just a tip-to run a good 5k time you've gotta master the 8 mile run. So noobs don't go out and run 5k over and over again and expect to get continually faster.
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Postby Strix » Thu Mar 11, 2004 10:47 pm

Pre-FABulous! :) Hey, my name IS Strixy for my IM's, hehe.

Hey, wow, thanks for the post! Geesh, I appreciate your taking the time :).

So how do I keep alkalinity? And by excessive acid do you mean don’t eat acidic foods, such as apples/oranges, etc.? I eat tons of fruit! Ack!

I like the way you break up your long runs…It sounds familiar. I may have read something similar in “Runner’s World” or some mag. It looks like this method would really increase improvement when running distance in both endurance and speed.

And wow, I had no idea that exceeding the 70% range actually works AGAINST fat burning! I knew it burned carbs (the new “evil” :D ) but thought that it burned fat too and continued to long after the workout ended.

NSX,ha? :) How about the 2002 NSX convertible!! :P

Now, I have a few questions on that site you linked…

The list of “Dos and Don’ts”:

Now, be patient with me if these questions are super-ignorant :oops:

The first “Do” says to “Change support quickly from one leg to another” – What exactly is meant by “support”? Is it just how quickly you’re running?? Or maybe there is a definition of “support” that I’m not aware of, specific to running… So lift quickly? Sounds like just “Move faster, you idiot!!” lol

On the “Don’ts” list: Now, this: "Don't touch ground with heels, keep them slightly above the ground" sounds nutty to me, lol. How can I not touch the ground with my heels?? Keep them off the ground??? Hmmm…I’m supposed to be running on air? :?

And Number 4: “Don't try to increase stride length or range of motion to increase your speed “
Just a comment/question: I find that I run faster, the smaller the strides/steps (sort of the way I initially interpreted the first “Do” I mentioned above). They seem to be quicker…Is that so, or is it my imagination? How is it for you? Does stride matter? ;)

And, Number 5 is completely lost on me!
“Don't move your knees and thighs too far apart, forward and backward, during stride” ???

Thanks again! :)
"The hand that signed the paper felled a city;
Five sovereign fingers taxed the breath,
Doubled the globe of dead and halved a country;
These five kings did a king to death."
-Dylan Thomas
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response to strix on pose method

Postby prefab » Fri Mar 12, 2004 12:11 am

Actually, strix you can go to about 80-85% HR and stay aerobic sorry bout that.

Acids come in a wide variety of forms-sugars are the primary form and yes fruit has them-Not that you should do away with the natural fruit sources in your diet but that there are more sustainable, cleaner burning fuels that should be the primary focus of a well-balanced diet. As you may have guessed alcohol, drugs, tobacco, carbonation, sugar, caffeine, processed foods (yes tofu, fake meats), brown rice has quite a bit of sugar in it, excessive exercise. So all of these things will pretty much crack those cell-membranes in your body allowing those wonderful things called free radicals to abound in your body, maybe they get a foothold and you end up with cancer?
Alkalinity is best maintained through eating a health diet made up primarily of you guessed it VEGETABLES. I try for 60-70% of each plate is vegetables. Kind of what the whole veganism thing is about--what a crazy way to live who woulda thunk that? Personally, I use green powders/superfoods to help put me over the top in greens, but to each his own. I've got plenty of posts about alkaline and green drinks. Spinach, parsley, cucumber, wheatgrass, barleygrass, algaes, ocean vegetables all soak up acid garbage in your body-coral calcium can also help. We've all heard about how much caloric energy lies in a pound of fat-and that if we had the ability to tap it-we could work intensely for hundreds of hours. Keeping your system alkaline helps keep your systems from shutting down fuel burn of substances like fat. It helps keep the metabolic flame on an even burn of protein-carbs-fats. The longer you can maintain that without engaging your carbohydrate/glycogen reserves the more go you'll have at the end of an event.

On the run technique:

In order to understand change of support the best way to emulate this is by practicing jogging in place. You'll notice that as one foot drops the other is up and so forth and you're probably not hitting your heels.

So basically each leg is a pole that you're momentarily supporting your upper body with back-and-forth on the balls of your feet. You wanna take this same movement outdoors with a powerful heel kick minimize the amount of leg swing. As in don't try to over-stride- let your body fall gently forward while each leg supports you then pops into a small ellipse while the other leg is supporting you.

Keep a high cadence especially if you hit a hill-"spin" like you would on a bike. Increase your economy of movement for this repeat action getting 90-100 left foot strikes a minute. This is the cadence that professionals run and for some reason seems to be an optimal rhythm for the human body (go figure). Fast feet=fast runner slow feet=slow runner. Have a decent heel kick don't drag your feet get those hamstrings strong and create a quicker cartridge return by folding your leg more like a wing. don't go crazy tho.

You don't want your leg flying way out in front of you like you are doing hurdles that is just slowing you down.

5) don't run bowlegged, and don't drive knees forward just relax and focus on a quick movement from support to support (foot to foot). Allow the natural elasticity in your foot and calf muscles to provide a suspension, however keep your vertical oscillation to a minimum, allowing all your movement and energy to be in a forward direction.

It's much easier to show in person or in video but it's not too hard to teach I think.
As a visual cue, I like to imagine that I'm stone-age man and may be carrying a spear of some sort and maybe a load bridged between me and my buddy. If I had to carry something like this on my shoulder and a spear in the other hand through a forest with various terrain while barefoot. What would be the safest most efficient way for me to move through that forest? Surely landing on my heel with all my forward momentum might puncture or cause my load to come loose from my shoulder. It seems I'd fair better to provide some natural suspension with my anatomy. pose method is that type of form. More often than not endurance sports are about finding a highly efficient form that provides consistent results.

p.s.--pops has a 2002 yellow nsx in the garage one of 400 in the world. It's one of my favorite cars since it's advent. I've managed to turn my dad into a collector over the years and he's had a few. Have you seen the new revamp coming out this winter or in 2005? Holy sheez!!!
What a great piece of craftsmanship those cars are--Took it to 150mph/240kmh in a street race for chits and giggles. What a ride just over a quarter mile run. I should get my pic in it so i can be miami vice, lol
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Postby Strix » Sun Mar 14, 2004 7:12 am

Ah, thanks for the great post, again, prefab :). Geez, I'm starting to feel like I owe you some cash ;) Okay, I'm learning so much here. I used to juice wheatgrass everyday, but stopped :(. I tried growing my own, but it just didn't work out well, lol. I can buy trays and keep them in the fridge, but it gets expensive...I haven't tried powdered greens on a regular basis, I suppose because I just get the feeling they're not as nutritious -- yea, not a good excuse :roll: I did use some spirulina powder when I hadn't picked up a tray of wheatgrass... I should just start juicing again. I really did feel great, having a couple shots a day. I found that juicing kale was a great way to get my daily greens too. Unfortunately, it can end up being a facilitator to elimination, in not the most desirable fashion :lol:

Ha!! A yellow NSX, cool :D That's a nice car. No I haven't seen the 2005's,are they convertibles? Sounds fun, hehe
"The hand that signed the paper felled a city;
Five sovereign fingers taxed the breath,
Doubled the globe of dead and halved a country;
These five kings did a king to death."
-Dylan Thomas
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Postby Frostfire » Sun Mar 14, 2004 8:30 pm

Hey Prefab,
Thanks for the details in running form. I'm going to start running again soon (when the snow melts outside at least) for the first time in a long time and I think your suggestions will help keep me injury free this time :). It really seems like common sense the way you explain it!
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