Bitter and confused; does fruit make us fat?

For all kinds of running related discussions, from sprinting to marathon, training to equipment. Also the forum for international <a href="http://www.veganrunners.org">veganrunners.org</a> network.

Moderators: hardcore iv, fredrikw, JP, stateofflux, bronco

Re: Bitter and confused; does fruit make us fat?

Postby jpowell » Sat Jul 28, 2012 4:04 am

[quote="custerdome"]
jpowell (and everyone):

Are there any legumes in particular that you recommend in conjunction with running? I often eat hummus for instance, which I love the taste of, but it also makes me feel quite heavy. Also, do you have any recommendations on what food to put in my running bag during 2+ hour runs?


Hummus is great, but chickpeas are famous for apparently having a high complex oligosaccharide structure which could make them more of a struggle to digest, plus, while sesame (tahini) is mostly a good thing to have some of, nutritionally, it can be high in omega6 fats if you eat too much all the time. Eat the amount and timing that works for you.

Personally, I find either brown or red lentils are great in combination with a very active lifestyle, not to eat huge amounts immediately prior, but to eat quite large amounts in general because, for me, I find they can easily be made relatively digestible and tasty.

I like brown lentils mostly but not thoroughly drained, mixed with oats, nutritional yeast and a few seeds/nuts, plus maybe some spices or soy sauce, then left to dry. Makes a good easy savory crumble topping, great start to a big meal. Sometimes I like the brown lentils by themselves or with some greens and salad dressing. Red lentils are good for making lentil soup because they cook really soft (add a bit of carrot, potato, garlic, etc. to taste). Alternatively, red lentil dahl is great. Lightly fry some finely chopped onion, garlic and a generous amount spices in a small amount of oil (to my thinking, preferably coconut, macadamia, peanut or red palm fruit oil), add lentils, water and lemon or lime juice (preferably fresh with the pulp) and cook well - make thick and mild-ish to eat lots with a small amount of rice, or thinner and very hot to use as a gravy for a large amount of rice.

I am thinking that red azuki bean East Asian style desserts would not be bad either, or even rice and mung bean based congee (probably needs to be cooked for quite a long time)... but getting around to either of these is just not something I really found time for.

HTH
jpowell
Member
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:04 pm

Re: Bitter and confused; does fruit make us fat?

Postby custerdome » Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:14 pm

jpowell:

Thanks for another great reply. I have done some thinking. What I would like to do for maybe a couple of weeks is stick to smoothies, to relieve my digestive system of some stress, and also bring some lasting change to my dietary habits; I find if I try do go too fancy and complicated too quickly, I fall back into old eating habits.

So. I was thinking about what foods I 1) like, 2) always have access to, 3) seem to digest easily, and came up with these items:

- hemp seeds (I buy them in bulk straight from the farmer)
- bananas (get them cheap from my local fruit market)
- dates and figs
- green lentil sprouts (your post reminded me how much I loved to sprout lentils way back)
- miso paste (yum!)
- green tea and yerba mate

Is there a risk I would run into serious deficiencies by blending various combinations of the above items for a couple of weeks? I also supplement with a multi pill, containing most vitamins and minerals (including D and B12). As a nice coincidence my new 1200 Watt blender should arrive early this coming week.

PS. Tried running a half marathon last night after a rather heavy hummus meal. Never again. DS.
custerdome
New Member
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2012 5:03 pm

Re: Bitter and confused; does fruit make us fat?

Postby jpowell » Sun Jul 29, 2012 5:14 am

[quote="custerdome"]jpowell:

hemp seeds (I buy them in bulk straight from the farmer)
- bananas (get them cheap from my local fruit market)
- dates and figs
- green lentil sprouts (your post reminded me how much I loved to sprout lentils way back)
- miso paste (yum!)
- green tea and yerba mate

Is there a risk I would run into serious deficiencies by blending various combinations of the above items for a couple of weeks? I also supplement with a multi pill, containing most vitamins and minerals (including D and B12). As a nice coincidence my new 1200 Watt blender should arrive early this coming week.



I am not a dietitian but in my opinion, absolutely, there is a big risk. I understand your motivation for it (many on here will not) but an ultra restrictive diet like that needs to be extremely well planned, and should probably be for a relatively short duration (say 1-2 weeks max unless you are very, very sure about it).

In my opinion:
[list=]
[*]This diet could be a bit deficient in fibre, but maybe not critically so. Green veges or seaweed could fix that.
[*] On this diet, you may well NEED a B complex supplement in addition to your general multi
[*]This diet will almost certainly be deficient in magnesium, manganese and selenium as well as carotenoids (pro vitamin A and good antioxidants, found in green and orange veges), and very likely iron, calcium and potassium, and possibly zinc, even allowing for the multivitamin. Absorption of minerals from food is not the same as from synthetic sources. A study found people who take multivitamins may live on average up to 17 years less than those who don't. My interpretation from what I could find was not mainly inherent problems with the supplements so much as over-reliance on them. All sorts of co-factors in naturally occurring foods as well as more varied forms of the nutrients, affect uptake. It's what we've evolved over millions of years as animals, and even up to the present day, to process. Supplements and fortified foods can help, but they didn't even exist until about 100 years ago, which is certainly not an evolutionary time frame, and in this case, that's not a specious argument or paleofantasy, it's a valid factor for consideration. If you eat lots more calories of low nutrient density foods, some minerals and vitamins will add up (maybe inadeqaute, but some). If you eat a smaller amount of nutrient dense foods, they will also add up. Supplements are generally designed to supplement, not replace food, anyway, so they assume you have a poor nutrient intake from food, not a negligible one. If you top it with supplements, it could help. If you tend to rely primarily/exclusively on supplements, IMO this is a really, really bad thing.
[*] Could you at least add a large plateful or two of steamed green steamed green veges (perhaps with lemon juice, garlic and pepper as a dressing), and plenty of seaweed, some onion greens and grated carrot to your miso, and maybe a little bit of shitake or other mushrooms? Calorie contribution will not be large but nutrient contribution will be!
[*] Maybe while we're at it, you can also ration yourself to at least 2-3 pieces of fresh whole non-sweet fruit per day to boost vitamin C and antioxidants? Tangelos, kiwi fruit, grapefruit, tamarillos, green apples, etc. The only reason I emphasize non-sweet is that you can get more nutrients per whatever amount of fruit you decide to eat.
[*] Cinamon, nutmeg, mace, cardamon or cloves could also be good antioxidants to add to your smoothie. Minimal calories, great health benefits, great taste, all natural. Cinamon in particular may help you absorb the sugar a bit more slow and steady, and if this is all/most of what you're eating, that's probably a very useful thing.
[*] I still think you may be a bit low on some aminos from your protein consumption, even with heaps of hemp and as much sprouted lentils as you can consume (from the top of my mind, most likely lysine, methionine and tryptophan). Would it be possible to at least add some rice protein or powdered oats to your smoothie, 50-100g dry weight of cooked brown/green lentils with those veges once a day, and maybe some wheat germ somewhere, even a little bit on top of your smoothie? The wheat germ will also provide a possibly much needed additional source of vitamin E.

[/list]

Again, I am not a dietitian and cannot guarantee that will be a good/adequate diet, but I'm sure it's a big improvement, and I hope it's in the spirit of what you're trying to do and in some way helpful.
jpowell
Member
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:04 pm

Re: Bitter and confused; does fruit make us fat?

Postby jpowell » Sun Jul 29, 2012 5:30 am

By the way, in case you're not familiar with eating seaweed in miso soup, different seaweeds have very different tastes, and you may find some not that pleasant but I find it hard to imagine anyone who really dislikes wakame, the kind most popularly used in miso. You should be able to find it at any Asian grocery store, either huge long packets of whole dried branches, or smaller packets pre crushed (it crumbles very easily into bite sized pieces anyway, when it's still dry). You don't need to "cook" the wakame as such, you just stand it in boiling water for a couple of minutes, like instant noodles. You can do it in the same water as the miso, at the same time.
jpowell
Member
 
Posts: 86
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:04 pm

Previous

Return to Vegan Runners

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron