Protein requirements for strength training

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Protein requirements for strength training

Postby Leen n Meen » Mon Nov 07, 2016 7:24 am

Hi guys,

I'm sure this has been asked a million times before.. I am wondering how much protein I should be consuming to increase muscle mass and what that might look like in a weekly food diary. I currently supplement protein with a pea and brown rice protein powder and feel like I'm getting some benefit from that, but I was wondering what kinds of foods I should be introducing and how much I should be eating during the day to increase mass.

I'm about 6ft, weigh 68-70kg and have a pretty slim frame.

Any advice would be appreciated!
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Re: Protein requirements for strength training

Postby vogiama » Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:22 am

Brown rice and pea protein- that you already take- is what I’d suggest for protein supplementation. I think resistance athletes will have more to say in this matter, than me.

Please do not go too crazy on protein powder supplements, because then your body will start burn excess protein as a fuel, yielding urea and ammonia, that are dangerous byproducts. Also, high protein consumption causes dehydration and it is tiring for kidneys.

0.8gr/kg/day is the protein intake recommendation for most people, but for very active individuals it can range from 1 to 1.2gr/kg/day.

Provided that you have a balanced diet and you are not protein deficient, the main thing that that you should focus on, is your resistance training. Because, muscles really grow in size, when they are stretched.

Also, if your workouts are intense, you will want to increase your calories. I will only give some general guidelines about what categories of everyday foods should be included in your diet.

First, better avoid sugar and heavily processed products. Then, choose a variety of high quality foods:

- plenty of fruits and vegetables
- variety of whole grains, focus on products made from whole rice, barley, rye, oats, corn, and pseudo grains (quinoa, buckwheat, millet, amaranth)
- legumes (lentils, variety of beans, peas, chick peas etc).
- healthy fats (like avocado, coconut oil, olive oil) and omega-3s (like chia seeds, flax seeds, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts)
- other raw nuts and seeds (like almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, brazil nuts, sunflower seeds etc) and their butters, to increase caloric intake (like peanut butter, almond butter or else)
- soaking and sprouting seeds and nuts enhances protein digestibility (use lentils, almonds, hemp seeds, chic peas etc)
- you can also include organic tempeh, tofu, seitan.
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Re: Protein requirements for strength training

Postby vogiama » Mon Nov 07, 2016 1:32 pm

[quote="vogiama"]Because, muscles really grow in size, when they are stretched.


Sorry, the english word I meant to say here is "stressed" not "stretched"
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Re: Protein requirements for strength training

Postby Leen n Meen » Thu Nov 10, 2016 7:09 am

Hey Vogiama,

Thanks for the comprehensive reply this is great! I was wondering what you meant by stretched haha. My strengthening routine is pretty comprehensive and I am burning a lot of energy doing it so I've upped the amount of food that I'm eating quite significantly. I'm trying to keep to wholefoods but the odd sandwich gets in there as it's easy.

I hadn't heard of overdoing it with my protein intake, maybe that's something I should monitor. The back of the packet recommends 1 scoop daily and I've been keeping to that. On top of that I'm eating quite a lot of legumes and tofu. Can't bring myself to eat tempeh yet, there's something strange about it!

I guess the reason I was asking was because I've been training quite hard and not seeing that bigger results..

I guess i'll have to just keep at it!
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Re: Protein requirements for strength training

Postby athlegan » Wed Nov 16, 2016 12:46 pm

Your liver will convert the ammonia into urea, which is a nontoxic byproduct. If you don't have any liver problems you have nothing to worry about whatsoever. But of course, as with everything nutrition related, don't go crazy in any extreme direction.

I wrote up more information about protein for vegans a while ago and it might answer some of your questions. Primarily, if you're strength training I'd recommend a level closer to 2 grams of protein per kilo lean body mass.

vogiama already covered a lot of good stuff but I'd add in to get a fitness app to help you track your intake (like Lifesum or MyFitnessPal). If you eat like you've always eaten, you'll have no different results. To grow you need to lift heavy and eat a lot.

Calculate your TDEE, add 500 kcal to it and then don't eat after hunger (!) but eat after the number your app tells you. Keep track of your weight (and body fat percentage, if possible), make a weekly average (because it can fluctuate a lot day to day), and then increase or decrease the daily calories as you grow or stall.
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Re: Protein requirements for strength training

Postby makira » Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:17 pm

[quote="vogiama"]Brown rice and pea protein- that you already take- is what I’d suggest for protein supplementation. I think resistance athletes will have more to say in this matter, than me.

Please do not go too crazy on protein powder supplements, because then your body will start burn excess protein as a fuel, yielding urea and ammonia, that are dangerous byproducts. Also, high protein consumption causes dehydration and it is tiring for kidneys.

0.8gr/kg/day is the protein intake recommendation for most people, but for very active individuals it can range from 1 to 1.2gr/kg/day.

Provided that you have a balanced diet and you are not protein deficient, the main thing that that you should focus on, is your resistance training. Because, muscles really grow in size, when they are stretched.

Also, if your workouts are intense, you will want to increase your calories. I will only give some general guidelines about what categories of everyday foods should be included in your diet.

First, better avoid sugar and heavily processed products. Then, choose a variety of high quality foods:

- plenty of fruits and vegetables
- variety of whole grains, focus on products made from whole rice, barley, rye, oats, corn, and pseudo grains (quinoa, buckwheat, millet, amaranth)
- legumes (lentils, variety of beans, peas, chick peas etc).
- healthy fats (like avocado, coconut oil, olive oil) and omega-3s (like chia seeds, flax seeds, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts)
- other raw nuts and seeds (like almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, brazil nuts, sunflower seeds etc) and their butters, to increase caloric intake (like peanut butter, almond butter or else)
- soaking and sprouting seeds and nuts enhances protein digestibility (use lentils, almonds, hemp seeds, chic peas etc)
- you can also include organic tempeh, tofu, seitan.


You have some super wonderful tips here. Thank you, i must say i learned a thing or two from this.
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Re: Protein requirements for strength training

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