Page 1 of 1

raw spinach vs cooked spinach myth?

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:08 pm
by ghost
So I was reading that 1 cup of cooked spinach has 840 mg of potassium. But it takes about 12 cups of raw spinach to equal 1 cup cooked. 1 cup raw has 160 mg of potassium.

So which really has more potassium? it seems for the same amount of spinach, 12 cups raw has 2,004 mg of potassium.

When nutritiondata says 1 cup cooked, does it mean that it was originally 1 cup of raw spinach that was cooked? Or 1 cup of spinach already cooked?

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:20 pm
by tal
I don't know, but does it really matter?

Just eat the spinach.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:45 pm
by bronco
The main difference is in how much spinach fits into a cup.With cooked spinach you can fit 180g into a cup, with raw spinach only 30g according to nutritiondata. If go to the page and change the serving size to something useful you will find out that 100g of cooked spinach contains 466mg of potassium, while 100g raw contains 558g. I hope this answers your question :) .
In general measuring things in volume is only useful for fluids.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 11:27 pm
by Gelert
[quote="Talyn"]I don't know, but does it really matter?

Just eat the spinach.


It's pretty important. Look what happened the last time assertions went unchallenged about micronutrients in spinach.

Image

The potassium in spinach leaves is there to maintain osmotic balance with oxalic acid, which binds also to the calcium in spinach rendering it useless as a source of calcium. And probably of potassium as well, but the potassium oxalate formed is likely to be soluble.

The left over oxalic acid ain't too good for your bones or kidneys, particularly if you have problems already so don't tear the arse out of the spinach. To put it in context, oxalic acid is what kills people who drink moonshine distilled in car radiators contaminated with antifreeze.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 1:10 am
by ghost
so in actuality there's more potassium in raw spinach than cooked spinach. And I thought the higher potassium content was due to the cooked spinach having more potassium available to the body.

Thanks Gelert for your awesome knowledge.

I'm surprised to find that most of the potassium in spinach isn't useful, and neither is the calcium, and I was eating tons of it just to get potassium and calcium since my diet has been very limited and I want to be low carb.

I really think getting enough minerals and vitamins is hard... I just dont know how to do it, and I want to know. I recently cut out all of my soy having found out that most soy is really bad, if not all. Even tempeh, or fermented foods have urethane. Soy has many antinutrients.

.... whatever I'll just keep doing research.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:03 pm
by Dave Noisy
Hey gelert - just to clarify, cooked spinach is of considerably less concern for oxalic acid, ain't it?

After reading this thread one may be inclined to fear spinach, which i think would be unnecessary!

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 4:05 am
by ghost
I dont think it affects potassium as much at least.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 5:11 am
by patvirt
POSTING IN SPINACH APPRECIATION THREAD.

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 1:26 am
by ghost
not sure if this is accurate but some believe that the oxalic acid in raw form is organic and doesn't affect absorption of nutrients or at least not as much, and might actually be beneficial to the body..

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 10:11 am
by thestoatyone
Not sure if cooking makes a difference but I've heard that oxalate binds with all sortsa shit that would otherwise accumulate in your joints and sequestrates it out of your body. Not so good for iron absorption but good for your overall health.

*Spinach curry yums*

PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 6:57 pm
by Dave Noisy
[quote="ghost"]not sure if this is accurate but some believe that the oxalic acid in raw form is organic and doesn't affect absorption of nutrients or at least not as much, and might actually be beneficial to the body..

I'm pretty sure it's the raw that is of most concern.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 7:14 pm
by emm7
ghost you do not need to obsess about the minutiae of nutrients and anti-nutrients. Just eat food you find pleasurable when you are hungry. The rate you are going with this obsessiveness, you will be living on water and a prayer before long. Well I say living but wasting away is more likely. Have talked to you about these issues before and it seems you are still going round in circles.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2009 9:35 am
by Gelert
Wise words from emm7 there.

[quote="Dave Noisy"]Hey gelert - just to clarify, cooked spinach is of considerably less concern for oxalic acid, ain't it?

After reading this thread one may be inclined to fear spinach, which i think would be unnecessary!


The values I've seen suggest that it's reduced somewhat in cooked spinach, but concentrated in frozen spinach. Not quite sure what's going on there. I suspect it might be because it's reacting with calcium etc.

[quote]not sure if this is accurate but some believe that the oxalic acid in raw form is organic and doesn't affect absorption of nutrients or at least not as much, and might actually be beneficial to the body..


Is bollocks mate. oxalic acid is an organic acid, is an organic acid, is an organic acid. And whether it is organic or not has no bearing on nutrient absoprtion.

Re: raw spinach vs cooked spinach myth?

PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 7:29 am
by Carolyn
There is something that no one considered with this particular topic. While spinach can be very healthy either raw or cooked, if anyone has a kidney disease the enormous difference in the amount of potassium can cause kidney failure.

As with most foods, just because something is good for you, eating more doesn't mean it's better. Moderation is always the key to eating healthy.

Re: raw spinach vs cooked spinach myth?

PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2016 3:15 pm
by makira
[quote="Carolyn"]There is something that no one considered with this particular topic. While spinach can be very healthy either raw or cooked, if anyone has a kidney disease the enormous difference in the amount of potassium can cause kidney failure.

As with most foods, just because something is good for you, eating more doesn't mean it's better. Moderation is always the key to eating healthy.

Wow, you have a really good point there i must say!