ehh question

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ehh question

Postby V VII Hero » Tue Aug 03, 2004 1:32 am

so there's this cereal that ive been eating: the ingredients are 100% vegan. but i decided anyway to read the small print at the bottom of the box. it says that the cereal is manufactured on the same equipment as their other stuff...equipment that processes soy, wheat, and whey.

is the cereal still vegan?

just because it's manufactured on the same equipment....does it mean it actually has whey in it, even though whey is not an ingredient? like does it mean that it might contain .00000001% whey, and that makes it not vegan?

I know this might be a silly question to ask, but I wanted other peoples opinions.

has anyone run into a similar situation?
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Postby Renecarol25 » Tue Aug 03, 2004 1:37 am

I think it is still vegan. Think of it like this most restaurants aren't vegan. So if we go to a non-vegan restaurant they also cook whatever else in the same pots / pans etc. That doesn't make our food any less vegan. They clean the equipement that they use to process the cereal before they make your cereal.
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Postby billyoffspring » Tue Aug 03, 2004 1:46 am

If it says that on the label it just means, as you said, it's processed on the same machinery. It's still vegan man. You aren't contributing to any suffering, as your product was not made with animal ingredients. It might contain trace amounts from other products, but those other products would have been made whether or not you bought the vegan cereal. So, keep eating it! Unless it's General Mills...I called them and they said they never know if their vitamins & minerals are vegan or non-vegan, as they change the sources of them often.
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Postby barbara » Tue Aug 03, 2004 2:45 am

I would say more than half of all of the products I buy have this! It is unavoidable. I was told it is there to protect the company from lawsuits due to allergies and the chances are really small that it actually will contain any of it. Most of the items listed are just main allergens that can be deadly to allergic people. Many times, it is produced in the same processing facility but using completely different machinery. If the same machinery is used it is definitely cleaned first. That is what the man from my grocery store tells me and he is an upfront honest guy!

I used to worry about it too but have been reassured enough times to be okay with it. Plus I wouldn't be able to eat most things otherwise!
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Postby V VII Hero » Tue Aug 03, 2004 2:59 am

yeh it was some allergy warning...

I was freaking out. cause i thought it had whey in it. geesh. calm down Topher it will be alright. haha.


thanks everyone! it makes sense now.
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Postby tylerm » Tue Aug 03, 2004 3:06 am

Yeah, no worries. So what if it is on the same equipment, I agree that they are just covering their asses incase someone has some allergic reaction and tries to sue.

I don't think a person's veganism shouldn't be a source of great worry, as in, if I accidently eat bread with a dairy derived ingredient in it, am I not a vegan? I think the rigidity that some people view veganism scares alot of people off. If someone lives a vegan lifestyle and once in a while eats something non-vegan, I am not going to hold it against them. I for one eat honey on occasion, I avoid it to a point, but some foods I really like has honey in it. I am not going to go eating eggs or drinking a glass of milk or something like that, and surely not any sort of by-product that an animal dies for. I remember reading somewhere else on this website about someone feeling scrutinized by other vegans for what they eat. That holier-than-thou attitude pisses me off.
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Postby V VII Hero » Tue Aug 03, 2004 3:29 am

understood.

I just wanted to make sure that what I was eating was vegan.
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Postby Mary » Tue Aug 03, 2004 5:52 am

Hey Hero.

It is called "cross contamination," and they have to give the warning to save them from suing if anyone got ill. Most often there are hardly any traces at all in the product, as they steam clean the line before changing the product. By buying from this company you are proving to them that they should carry on making a vegan product. :)
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Postby stateofflux » Tue Aug 03, 2004 6:37 am

What would you do if the product contained 1% or 0.5% milk powder? I had this argument with someone recently who insisted that the product was vegan because it only contained between 0,5% and 1% milk powder (it was on the ingredient list, not a separate warning). I think in that case I draw the line, and that's not what I'd call a vegan product. I personally avoid a product that I don't really need if it contains a dairy/fish (the most common) trace, especially if it's junk and I don't really need it. It helps me eat clean(er) anyway! But yes, pretty much everything you buy from a non-vegan company is probably subject to cross containation from the same equipment (and even some products from vegan companies may share equipment with non-vegan food producers :?
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Postby barbara » Tue Aug 03, 2004 7:04 am

I would draw the line there too because to me it is is like saying there is a 100% chance that it contains animal product.

I have some difficulty here where I am with shopping. My grocey store is getting much better and will special order vegan stuff for me on occasion. But even my plain old 100% rolled oats says it is processed in a facility that processes nuts (don't care about that!) but also that it may contain trace milk ingredients! :shock: How that could happen is still unclear to me :?
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Postby kettlebellnut » Tue Aug 03, 2004 7:12 am

VeganEssentials had this explanation when a similar topic came up surrounding the Alpsnack bars. Hope it helps.

[quote]Actually, all the Alpsnack flavors are in fact vegan - the "may contain traces of milk" on the label is the same as with 99% of all chocolate companies, an allergy warning, not an indication that there's dairy in the finished item. As has become standard, chocolate companies who can't afford separate dedicated non-dairy machinery have to steam clean production equipment between runs of dairy and dark chocolate, so this warning is a must. Being as there are people who could have an allergic reaction (potentially life-threatening to some) from as little as 1 part per million if somehow a trace particle in the air made its way into the food bar, this is why the warning is on there.

Basically, you'll inevitably end up getting far more meat and dairy cross-contamination if you eat at a restaurant that isn't 100% vegan. I've never been to a non-vegan restaurant that goes so far as to steam clean their utensils and cookware between every meal cooked on it Very Happy Hopefully someday as the demand for dark chocolate increases there will be more companies making their stuff on dedicated machinery, but for now, unless you only want to eat Green & Black's, Plamil or Tropical Source you'll be guaranteed to be having chocolate made on shared equipment!

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Postby JP » Tue Aug 03, 2004 7:52 am

I have a vegan friend who is so violently allergic to dairy that he can't eat any products made in shared equipment, because it is, like Ryan mentiones in the above quote, life threathning. He learned this hard way as well eating a vegan product, which apparently then did indeed have a trace of dairy in it in this unlucky occasion...
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Postby Mary » Tue Aug 03, 2004 11:03 am

[quote="barbara"]But even my plain old 100% rolled oats says it is processed in a facility that processes nuts (don't care about that!) but also that it may contain trace milk ingredients! :shock: How that could happen is still unclear to me :?


It is probably that the company make meusli, and like many other cereal companies uses milk by products as a filler. This would then lead to the theoretical possibility of cross contamination with dairy products.

I am not able to drink alpro chocolate soya, as I found out (the hard way!) that it is not gluten free. One of the flavourings is bound on with a gluten by product. :( I had my first attack of colitis in years before I realised what had caused it.

If I was allergic to both forms of gluten I would be doomed!

Personally I avoid the risk of cross contamination where possible, but as it can be seen as ethical for a vegan to persuade non vegan companies to produce vegan goods by proving a demand I don't have any problem with occasionally buying something that might have some cc. However, ideally we should support vegan companies. This is a moral mine field really! But there is no problem Hero using the stuff, as he does need to eat stacks to keep up his routine. Also, as he is a one man eating machine he is increasing supply and demand for a vegan product in a big way. :lol:
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Postby tylerm » Tue Aug 03, 2004 5:01 pm

If a product contained .5 or 1% milk powder, I would not purchase it. I also try and avoid processed foods as much as possible. I buy cereal, aside from that most everything I get is tofu, beans, rice, grains fruits and veggies that I cook.
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Postby Mary » Tue Aug 03, 2004 5:02 pm

Same here Tylerm. 8) If they add an animal product to a recipe, then it isn't vegan.
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